Sean Mulkerrin

In this week’s Enterprise library notes, Lynn Kohler writes that the Voorheesville Public Library’s $1.2 million budget for next year — which is down from $1.35 million this year — was developed without increasing property taxes and was approved by the board of trustees at its March 6 meeting.  “For this reason, Kohler writes, “a public vote on the budget is not required and will not appear on the 2021 ballot.”

Azam Khan and Marielle McKasty-Stagg are seeking a position as library trustee in Voorheesville's May 18 district vote.

The winner will hold the unpaid position for a five-year term starting in July.

We interviewed the candidates on their visions for the position.

First proposed in 2019, Spruce Plaza, a 1.82-acre site directly across Route 20 from Guilderland Town Hall, would be a mixed-use development consisting of professional offices, restaurants, and apartments.

A paperwork snafu held up the approval of a new tattoo shop in Altamont Corners while the village planning board told the owner of Curry Patta restaurant, also located in the plaza, it needed additional information about a cigar and hookah area she wants to have on the deck expansion it approved last month.

At its April 13 meeting, the Voorheesville Planning Commission heard not one but two presentations from area entrepreneurs looking to open restaurants in the village — one a craft brewery and restaurant; the other, an eatery that has yet to be determined. 

The proposed five-megawatt solar array on Dunnsville Road still has to be sent to the Altamont-Guilderland Referral Committee because proposals for town projects within 1,200 feet of the village boundary or within 1,200 feet of Altamont’s current or future water system must be referred to the village for a recommendation. 

The proposed five-megawatt solar array on Dunnsville Road still has to be sent to the Altamont-Guilderland Referral Committee because proposals for town projects within 1,200 feet of the village boundary or within 1,200 feet of Altamont’s current or future water system must be referred to the village for a recommendation. 

There had been discussion for some time about bringing the New Scotland Building Department, “essentially [into] the 21st Century, where we have more of a planner handling some of the planner duties. Because in our town, historically, with our zoning, the building inspector has handled all of these duties,” Councilman William Hennessy said.

On May 18, voters in the Voorheesville Central School District will be asked to approve a $26.95 million budget for the 2021-22 school year, an increase of approximately 3.58 percent over this year’s spending plan.

Enrollment in the Voorheesville Central School District is projected to increase to 1,300 by 2025-26, a nearly 100-student increase from its current count, 1,204.

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