Mike Nardacci

A recurrent problem in geology is the sudden appearance of what researchers term a “leave-it.”

Among American novels, J.D. Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye” is one of those that until not many years ago every high-school student would read — perhaps had read in junior high — and would read again as a young adult to savor its protagonist Holden Caulfield’s wry put-downs of the “phoniness” of the adult world.

The writings of Robert M. Coates are unknown to the average reader these days. The last time I taught from a high school anthology of literature that contained one of his stories was in 1977 — a harrowing tale about a middle-aged married couple harassed by a gang of teenage thugs.

The writings of Robert M. Coates are unknown to the average reader these days. The last time I taught from a high school anthology of literature that contained one of his stories was in 1977 — a harrowing tale about a middle-aged married couple harassed by a gang of teenage thugs.

tufa bedrock

Situated in the picturesque village of Vanhornesville west of Albany is a display of unique geologic features called “tufa caves” that — along with the village itself — are likely unknown to most p

To cross the Hudson River and head east on routes 43 or 2 or 7 onto the Rensselaer Plateau is to enter a landscape vastly different both geologically and topographically from that west of the river

Like John Greenleaf Whittier before him, Robert Frost is often thought of as a bard of cozy evenings by a fire, an impression created by poems such as “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,”  “After Apple Picking,” “Mending Wall,” and “The Road Not Taken,” anthologized in middle- and high-school textbooks in this country for generation

One of the fascinating things about reading older science-fiction stories is discovering that their authors predicted often years or even decades in advance things that came to be: Jules Verne’s lunar travel vehicles, Czech writer Karel Capek’s robots, Arthur C. Clarke’s communication satellites.

A common plot in British and American literature is the tempestuous romance that erupts between a beautiful, wealthy, cultivated woman and a handsome proletarian dude with no money or life prospects whatsoever.

Author’s note:  For years, I have been telling my English classes that someday I wanted to edit an annotated anthology titled “Short Stories I Wish I Had Written.”  I do not have any publishers beating down my door to get such a volume into print, but since we are all stuck in our homes these days, this seemed a good time to share some

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