The Stewarts will speak on Stephen Meyers, a local activist in the Underground Railroad

— In the public domain, Cincinnati Art Museum

“The Underground Railroad,” painted by Charles T. Webber in 1893, captures the arduousness faced by people trying to escape slavery.

To the Editor:

On Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. at the Clarksville Community Church, the Clarksville Historical Society invites you to join us for our second in the series of Fall programs.

Paul and Mary Liz Stewart will tell us about Stephen Myers in a talk called “Central Underground Railroad Activist Living on the Borderlands of Abolition.”

Did you know about the Underground Railroad activity that took place right here in the Capital District? Join us to discover what part this area played in this segment of history.

Stephen Myers, a man enslaved in Rensselaer County who became the central Underground Railroad activist in the Capital Region, was not satisfied to simply assist freedom seekers making their way into the Capital Region.

He dedicated his life to working for equity and justice for all Americans through land-grant programs, newspaper publications, suffrage and labor union committees, Colored Men’s Conventions and recruiting young men for enlistment in the United States Colored Troops.

Stephen Myers was a man of action whose legacy lives on today.

Paul and Mary Liz Stewart are co-founders of Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region Inc.,  a public history organization dedicated to researching and preserving local Underground Railroad history.

Their research into local Underground Railroad history has contributed to the understanding of the impact of this historic movement in the history of New York State and the nation.

Marilyn Miles

Program Coordinator

Clarksville Historical Society

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