history

Joel Willsey​, Berne

Chris Albright

“Information is power,” said surveyor Cynthia Elliot of a project to map the burial grounds in New Scotland.

WRIGHT — The Gallupville House Association has launched a website that went live on Feb. 21.

Speaking for the association, Chris Claus in a release praised the site as “a work of art, volunteerism and community. And that’s the Gallupville House, in a nutshell.”

“A huge number of people have expressed interest in [finding] an alternative to development,” said Mark King, executive director of the Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy. “We’re trying to wrangle those interests into something we could present as an alternative.”

“The last time I talked to my sister we agreed the vultures are just waiting to pounce,” Herman Picard said.

The property has an historic house and barn, which are to be demolished, and is also in the midst of the Helderberg Conservation Corridor.

Charles Gehring who lives in New Scotland goes each day to work at the New York State Library in Albany where he travels back in time several hundred years. His life’s work has been translating the records of New Netherland, which the English claimed at the fort in New Amsterdam when they took over from the Dutch in 1664.

The new world Charles Gehring is discovering and charting for us to follow isn’t like the continent unknown to Europeans that explorers like Henry Hudson claimed for the Dutch. Rather, Gehring’s work is giving us the tools to better understand our history.

Dennis Sullivan describes a grand gathering in 1917 — a fundraiser for the Red Cross during World War I, which attracted 2,000 people to the Bender farm, where Charles’s wife, Elizabeth Bender, had hit upon the idea of serving slices of melon topped with ice cream.

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