Sean Mulkerrin

Formerly the county’s jail, the renamed Albany County Corrections and Rehabilitative Services Center will soon be able to provide housing and services to 100 people, chiefly to the recently paroled and area homeless.

Twin sisters Taylor Ten Eyck, right, and Morgan Willy

Joining a nationwide movement of farmer-florists, twin sisters Taylor Ten Eyck and Morgan Willy recently started their own company called Twin Dahlias Flowers. When it’s completely up and running, the business will not only grow flowers but also create bouquets and arrangements for sale. 

Voorheesville recently had a study performed to assess the feasibility of placing sewer lines in and around Main Street and Voorheesville Avenue. With the study in hand, the village is now looking for grants to help defray the project’s $3.6 million cost.

With the cost of most things knowing only one direction — up — local municipalities have the opportunity to help their residential electricity customers slash their bills by, perhaps, two-thirds.  

Citing the need for further review, the Altamont Board of Trustees made no decision on the rezone of 107-109 Helderberg Ave.

Voorheesville

VOORHEESVILLE — The two women who keep Voorheesville running like a well-oiled machine, received the bureaucratic equivalent of rave reviews for their handling of the village’s billing, collection, and enforcement of water and sewer charges, according to a recently released state audit.

The Altamont Board of Trustees asked the court that the case brought against it by a group of residents be dismissed. 

Albany County Helderberg-Hudson Rail Trail pavilion

In nearly two decades of existence, the Voorheesville Community and School Foundation has given away over $200,000 to help fund local projects. Between Sept. 3 and Oct. 1, the group will be accepting applications for its latest initiative, the “Big Ideas” competition.

At its September meeting, the Altamont Board of Trustees has a chance to finally lay to rest a problem that has roiled the village, its residents, and Stewart’s Shops for much of 2019. 

capped landfill on New Scotland’s Upper Flatrock Road

As part of the state’s ambitious climate law that was passed last month, by 2030, the Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act states, 70 percent of New York’s electricity has to come from renewable sources, and, by 2040, all electricity in the state is to be generated from 100-percent carbon-free sources. Currently, New York is far from its 2030 goal and has just over a decade to try to almost double the number of renewable energy sources in the state. 

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