New Scotland Dems hold on to tight wins with inclusion of absentee ballots

Enterprise file photo — Sean Mulkerrin 

New Scotland Councilman Dan Leinung, shown here on Election Night, kept his seat on the town board after all the absentee ballots were counted.

NEW SCOTLAND — The addition of absentee ballots did not give New Scotland Republicans the outcome they had been hoping for on Election Night

The four Democrats who all held leads on their four Republican or GOP-backed challengers on Nov. 2 continued to do so after Nov. 17, when the absentee ballot counts were released by the Albany County Board of Elections. 

Supervisor Douglas LaGrange, who faced his first-ever opposition, from Republican Erik Grissell this year, saw his vote count increase from 1,673 to 1,763 votes compared to Grissell’s 1,381 to 1,451, an approximate 55 to 45 percent win for the Democrat.  

In the race for town board, Democrats Adam Greenberg and Dan Leinung saw their share of the vote increase respectively from 1,529 to 1,612 and 1,541 to 1,620 compared to 1,450 to 1,524 for Charissa Mayer and 1,442 to 1,518 for Peter Drao — a roughly 26 percent to 24 percent win for each Democrat. 

The night’s nailbiter, the race for town clerk, saw Lisa Williams gain three votes from Election Night, opening up a 25-vote lead over Conservative Lori Dollard, with the number of ballots cast for Williams increasing from 1,536 to 1,616 votes compared to Dollard’s 1,5141 to 1,591. 

New Scotland’s Democratic town judge, Robert Johnson, and its highway superintendent, Ken Guyer, faced no opposition on Nov. 2. 

More New Scotland News

  • On Election Night, three of the four incumbent New Scotland Democrats facing Republican challengers were still facing uncertain futures as a number of absentee ballots had yet to be counted. But the Democrats breathed a collective sigh of relief on Nov. 17 after the release of the absentee-ballot counts. However, the recanvass results recently released by the Albany County Board of Elections should give Democrats pause as they show that Republicans — there are six for every 10 Democrats in town — are becoming more competitive.

  • During a recent public hearing on the village’s proposed local law that would have Voorheesville opt out of both retail sales of marijuana and on-site consumption, the board of trustees heard very little in the way of agreement for its proposal. 

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