zoning

Not even a pandemic could keep Stewart’s from receiving its variances. 

“Are we going to put life on hold?” asks Guilderland Supervisor Peter Barber.

Some of the towns with land on the Helderberg escarpment where large wind turbines were proposed in 2008 drafted laws on wind energy; others haven’t.

Witnesses called by Sharf Din, who acted as his own attorney, did not dispute the evidence and acknowledged the violation was longstanding and still ongoing, wrote Town Justice Denise Randall in her decision. Din’s witnesses offered various cultural and psychological explanations for Din’s behavior, she wrote, but “an explanation for illegal behavior is not the same as a defense.” 

Stewart’s Shops proposed Altamont Boulevard project got a big boost this week after the village zoning board approved variances the company needed because building a project compliant with Altamont’s code was not possible.

A solar developer who wants to build an array on a Guilderland farm asked, at Tuesday’s hearing on the town’s proposed new solar law, if Guilderland could designate a solar overlay district.

Despite first appearances, Westerlo’s “new” zoning law is not an overhaul of the original 1989 document, but a necessary update that keeps the town in favor with New York State.

Stewart’s Shops’ three variance requests for its Altamont Boulevard expansion project must pass five criteria used by the zoning board.

“A huge number of people have expressed interest in [finding] an alternative to development,” said Mark King, executive director of the Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy. “We’re trying to wrangle those interests into something we could present as an alternative.”

Until litigation against the project resolves, no progress will be made on the question of what the approved Hiawatha Trails project needs to do to meet the state fire code. 

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