village

The mayor thanked many people at a farewell gathering for his retirement from office. He said he was leaving Altamont in a good spot.

Altamont’s $2 million budget includes 2-percent raises for village workers with longevity bonuses — all with the same tax rate of $2.73 per $1,000 of assessed valuation.

Trustee Richard Straut, newly elected to his appointed post, plans to continue the work he has started  — on water, sidewalks, and helping to develop a comprehensive plan for the village.

A 14-member comprehensive land-use committee, developing the village’s first master plan, is is to have its work completed within 10 months.

Faced with two controversial planning issues this year that brought crowds to village board meetings, Voorheesville now has a 14-member committee that is working on a comprehensive land-use plan, which the village board hopes will be completed within a year.

For about $38,600, covered by grants and contributions, Altamont will soon have a series of signs at 26 sites, meant to inform residents and attract visitors.

“Bells for Burls” is a campaign to bring a carillon to St. John’s Church in Altamont, honoring Mark “Burls” Burlingame who listened to the music as he lay dying.

One neighborhood’s concern over dog feces has led the village to agree to post signs and bag dispensers in several Voorheesville locations.

After months of increasingly bitter disputes, the village and Voorheesville Area Ambulance Service, on the cusp of a new contract, are working together to resolve differences.

To the Editor:

If the old adage holds true that good neighbors keep their noises to themselves, a lot of residents in Voorheesville in general, and in the village of Voorheesville in particular, need to re-evaluate the kind of neighbor they think they are.

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