If you ignore something long enough, it will go away. When I was a paper-pusher, that was one of the unspoken, unwritten rules. The assumption was that anything really important would keep rising to the top of the pile, and you would have to deal with it; everything else would eventually be forgotten.

In a lot of situations, this is probably true. No one really cares if every figurine on the mantel has been dusted, but on the rare occasions when I let anybody into the used-book and cat-hair emporium I call my home, I will go stark staring crazy for some period of time before they arrive because my lizard brain is telling me that everything has to be perfect.

The fact that this is physically impossible is irrelevant. Ultimately, that’s why I put off wrapping gifts for as long as possible. Every shortcut I take conjures the disapproving face of my German grandfather.

He used to carry a tiny pair of scissors in his vest pocket, which were used to snip the ribbon on a package so close to the knot that you had nearly the whole length left to use over again. We also saved the paper, of course; I swear I have bits of gift wrap from the ’60s in the file folder I use for pieces of paper too small to use on larger packages. (I really wish I were kidding on that one.)

Now, I understand that World War II and the Depression impressed themselves pretty forcefully on his whole generation. To save money on something, you spent more time, and made it yourself instead of buying it. I get that, but in my family, the time and effort spent on something became a value in and of itself.

The paper for every gift had to be measured to fit the box, and cut with a long, sharp knife so there would be a clean, straight edge. Every one of those edges had to be folded over (like hemming a pair of pants), and if you had done it correctly, only three small pieces of tape were needed to hold the wrapping together.  Bows had to be made by hand; anything less indicated a sloppy mind and lack of care. All food had to be made from scratch, even after mixes were just as good (I still resent that fact).

All this made preparing for a holiday something to dread, because in my double-or-nothing world, you were either perfect or not perfect. Gee whiz, the things we do to ourselves!

Several years ago, after hearing this psychobabble tale of woe, my best friends convinced me to stop folding edges and hand-making bows. I now save quite a bit of time, but I still feel guilty. My elderly, always-right grandfather, who died more than 50 years ago, is still in the background critiquing the performance.

I read somewhere that Japanese master craftsmen always build one tiny, deliberate flaw into each thing they make, as an acknowledgement that nothing in nature is ever perfect. I like that. It shows an acceptance of life as less than perfect, but still exquisitely beautiful. Maybe if I started wearing kimonos more often.

I am making progress, though, especially now that rustic and craftsy have become so popular. If I’m lucky, pretty soon I’ll be able to wrap everything in newspaper, or just leave it in its brown paper bag, and I will be in the height of fashion.

Coming up

December is always fashionable; it is National Tie Month.  The coming week is National Hand-Washing Awareness Week, Recipe Greetings For The Holidays Week, and Cookie Exchange Week.  World Wildlife Conservation Day is the 4th, AFL-CIO Day and Bathtub Party Day are the 5th. National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day is December 7th; and so is National Cotton Candy Day, and Special Kids Day. The 10th is Pretend To Be A Time Traveler Day, Dewey Decimal System Day, and Gingerbread Decorating Day.

I don’t know if there will be gingerbread, but you can find out by joining the Hilltown Seniors for their holiday party at the Rock Road Chapel on (what else?) Rock Road on Saturday, Dec. 10. Cost is $10 per person for members and guests, and the rumor is that the entree will be ham. Reservations can be made by calling Linda Carman at 872- 2448.  Please try to reserve by Dec. 5, and bring a non-perishable food item for the food pantry. They will also be collecting mittens and scarves to decorate a mitten tree at the BKW school.

The senior shopping bus’s next trips are scheduled for Dec. 14 and Dec. 28. Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

On Dec. 6, the crafts after lunch group will be making tabletop snowmen. Once you take your snowman home, you can say that you have your holiday decorating done.

The bus trip to Cooperstown on Saturday, Dec. 17 is rapidly approaching. We will see a production of “A Christmas Carol” at the Farmers Museum.  The bus leaves at 10:30 a.m.  We will stop for lunch at “Mel’s 22" restaurant (buy your own), and then on to the performance at 2 p.m.  Cost is $12.50 per person. Call Karen Schimmer at 872-2544 to reserve a seat.

Menu

Lunch next week at the Berne Community and Senior Services Center will be a chance to escape from the holiday madness and enjoy a hot lunch with friends and neighbors.  December birthdays will be celebrated with cake on Tuesday.  Doors open at 11 a.m, and lunch is served promptly at noon. We also have games, dominoes, and cards after lunch.

— Monday, Dec. 5, lemon oregano fish, stewed tomatoes and zucchini, hash browned potatoes, rye bread, citrus ambrosia, and milk;

— Tuesday, Dec. 6, herbed chicken with gravy, roasted sweet potatoes, broccoli, wheat bread, birthday cake, and milk; and

— Friday, Dec. 9, Spanish rice, carrots, corn bread, brownie, and milk.

Call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch, email her at   , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number

Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The Town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

Location:

How rich are you? I am incredibly wealthy, but wait, did you think I was talking about money? No way! Money is nice, certainly, and I wish we all had more of it, but I’m talking about some of the real basics.

Can you read this article? Then your eyes, even with glasses, must be pretty good, and you have the glasses you need.

How’s your breathing?  Can you take a deep breath?  Another one for the wealth list. I saw my father in an iron lung, lying in a giant metal tube just to be able to breathe. Sure, I get short of breath sometimes, but I don’t have to stop every three feet just to get enough air.

Speaking of feet, can you walk? Is the pain in your feet so bad that each step is agony? No? Another one for the gratitude list.

Yes, I have a mental gratitude list. I go over it when I’m starting to feel sorry for myself.

I’ve always wanted a 1961 Jaguar XKE; I think they’re going for about half a million these days. Will I die tomorrow if I don’t have one?  Probably not (and I’m grateful for that, too).

People around the world are dying every day for lack of the things we take for granted. Did you sleep in a bed last night, or over a storm grate on a piece of cardboard?  Is your house still standing, and on its foundation? You mean it doesn’t have six feet of water in the dining room, and you have a dining room instead of a pile of broken lumber? How lucky you are!

Is there any food in your fridge? Do you have a fridge? Do your kids have cereal, and gummy vitamins? If times get tough, is there a food pantry where you can get supplies to last until the next check? Wow! You say you could also go to a free Thanksgiving dinner at Equinox, or the American Legion? What a blessing!

How many of your friends and loved ones died last week? How many of them were shot, or blown up by IEDs? Losing a loved one hurts like hell, and I’m not diminishing that pain, but let’s put it in perspective.

If I’m really, really sick, is there a doctor, or a hospital that I could go to? Is there an ambulance to take me there? We have volunteer EMTs and firefighters who will gladly drop their Thanksgiving forks, abandon their pie, and rush to their cars to give you aid.

Yeah, sometimes parts of our bodies don’t work perfectly; I have arthritis that’s a real pain (literally!) on occasion, but I still have arms and legs. How many of our veterans, young men and women with a lot more of their lives ahead of them than we have, are trying to learn all over again how to walk with a prosthesis, or hug their kids with mechanical arms?

Can you hear the snow crunch in winter, or smell the earth after a rain? Can you hear the wind in the trees, or the cicadas on a hot summer night? If someone you know is in trouble, or desperately needs help, are you able to give them a call to let them know someone cares, or go over, or send a card, or bring them a casserole?  How fortunate we all are.

When the person at the head of the table asks us what we’re thankful for next Thursday, can you think of anything to say?

Coming up

In addition to Thanksgiving, November is Adopt A Turkey Month, National Diabetes Month and Sweet Potato Awareness Month  (only one helping of those candied yams, please), Pet Diabetes Month (so don’t give all the leftovers to Fido), and National Native American Heritage Month (so we remember who gave all of us immigrants our first start in this new country).

This coming week, Nov. 20 to 26, is National Farm-City Week, National Game and Puzzle Week, Better Conversation Week, International Restorative Justice Week, National Bible Week, and National Family Week.

National Peanut Butter Fudge Day is the 20th, as is the Transgender Day of Remembrance, and Universal Children's Day. The 21st is World Hello Day. National Espresso Day is the 23rd, and Celebrate Your Unique Talent Day, Flossing Day, and Maize Day are the 24th. The 25th is International Hat Day and Small Business Day.

The senior shopping bus’ next two trips are scheduled for Nov. 30 and Dec. 14. Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

On Dec. 6, the crafts after lunch will be making snowmen out of (who would have guessed?) canning jar rings.

The bus trip to Cooperstown on Saturday, Dec. 17 is rapidly approaching. We will see a production of “A Christmas Carol” at the Farmers Museum. The bus leaves at 10:30 a.m. We will stop for lunch at “Mel’s 22" restaurant (buy your own), and then on to the performance at 2 p.m.  Cost is $12.50 per person. Call Karen Schimmer at 872-2544 to reserve a seat.

Menu

We can be thankful for Monday and Tuesday lunch at the senior center, but remember to take Friday off, so all those folks who prepare our food can have a day off, too. Doors open at 11 a.m., and lunch is served promptly at noon. We will also have games, dominoes, and cards on Monday and Tuesday.

— Monday, Nov. 21, chicken with peach sauce, broccoli, roasted red potatoes, wheat bread, Tapioca pudding, and milk; and

— Tuesday, Nov. 22, chili con carne, spinach, corn bread, apple crisp, and milk.

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch, or email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number.  If you’d just like to come and help out, give Mary Moller a call at 861-6253, or email her at , and put “volunteer” in the subject line.

Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The Town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

I keep hearing that “reality TV” is increasing in popularity these days. What I don’t understand is what “reality TV” is. OK, it’s television; I get that. There is absolutely no question that it appears on TV. But what makes it “reality,” as distinguished from other kinds of experience, or other kinds of TV?

To paraphrase Webster’s dictionary, reality is the state or quality of being real, or resembling what is real; real facts or things, as different from fantasy; something that exists independent of other things, or even ideas about it. Real means true, not imaginary or fictitious.

OK, but reality TV pays the people who appear in its episodes. Nobody pays me for getting out of bed every day.  “Reality” TV follows people around with a camera, sound equipment, directors, and story editors. I haven’t seen any videographers lurking at the library, or out behind the firehouse lately. Maybe I’m just not interesting enough; do they follow you around?

If real means not fictitious, why do the producers have writers? How is reality TV any different from the episode of “Law and Order” I saw last night?

A lot of the “Law and Order” stories are based on actual events, whereas it seems unlikely to me that large groups of carefully selected people spontaneously arrive on desert islands or vacant, fully-furnished houses.

So, if “reality” as defined by TV means a situation dreamed up by storytellers or scriptwriters, that occurs within the boundaries of a particular geographic location, and is recorded in sound and images to be viewed by millions of other people, then what is my life supposed to be?

It doesn’t follow a storyline that anybody human knows, it is almost never filmed, and it seems to occur all over the place, wherever I am. Certainly nobody pays me for showing up, and I don’t get fan mail.  So if reality TV is real, what are we?

Coming up

November is Aviation History Month, Military Family Appreciation Month, National Adoption Month, National Family Caregivers Month, Picture Book Month , and World Sponge Month. This week is Geography Awareness Week, National Nurse Practitioner's Week, National Split Pea Soup Week, World Kindness Week, and National Book Awards Week. World Kindness Day and World Orphans Day is the 13th ; National American Teddy Bear Day and National Spicy Guacamole Day are the 14th.

The 15th is National Bundt Pan Day and National Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day.  Married To A Scorpio Support Day, Mickey Mouse Day, and National Apple Cider Day all fall on the 18th, and we end the week on the 19th with Rocky and Bullwinkle Day.

The Helderberg Seniors lunch bunch had a great time at their Halloween party on the 31st, and the Hilltown seniors will be celebrating Thanksgiving at their meeting Nov. 12 at the Berne Reformed Church.

Crafts after lunch on Tuesday, Nov. 15 will be pine cone zinnias. Make a bowl of them for the holidays.  For December, we will be making some very creative snowmen after lunch on the 6th.

The senior shopping bus next two trips are scheduled for Nov. 16 and 30. Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

There is a bus trip to Cooperstown on Saturday, Dec. 17, to see a production of “A Christmas Carol” at the Farmers Museum. The bus will leave at 10:30 a.m.  We will stop for lunch at “Mel’s 22" restaurant (buy your own), and then on to the performance at 2 p.m.  Cost is $12.50 per person. Call Karen Schimmer at 872-2544 to reserve a seat.

Menu

The lunchtime menu for next week at the Berne Community and Senior Services Center is here at last. Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch is served promptly at noon. We also have games, dominoes, and cards on Mondays and Tuesdays. Remember, there will be no lunch on Friday, Nov. 25 (day after Thanksgiving).

In case you missed the announcement, the lunch program is now offering transportation.  Just let Linda Hodges (872-0940) know you’d like a ride when you call to reserve lunch.

Monday, Nov. 14, lasagna roll-up, chickpea salad, wheat Italian bread, pears and milk;

Tuesday, Nov. 15, meatloaf with tomato gravy, cauliflower, oven roasted potatoes, wheat bread, pound cake with strawberries and whipped topping, and milk; an

Friday, Nov. 18, mac and cheese, stewed tomatoes, wheat bread, baked apples, and milk.

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch or arrange transportation. You can also email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number.  If you’d just like to come and help out, give Mary Moller a call at (518) 861-6253, or email her at , and put “volunteer” in the subject line.

Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The Town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

Location:

I love mysteries, especially the ones that are described in the genre as “cozies.” Those are the ones set in English manor houses, with fluffy old dears like Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple of St. Mary Meade.

I prefer the amateur detectives, who rely on perception and reason in place of advanced technology. The mental exercise is fun, but most of all I crave the sheer delight of escape. I want to be transported to somewhere (and somewhen) nostalgic, comfortable, and pleasant, with just a touch of the archaic.

The victim is never someone you really care about; as a matter of fact, the victim is often most deserving of an untimely demise. Meanwhile, one can wander among the portraits in the gallery, and admire the family crests and armaments on the walls. There must, of course, be a large, slobbering hound somewhere about the place, and servants, so you never need worry about dirty dishes and the residues of exotic poison.

I understand that other types of fiction provide their own kinds of escape, and perhaps the defeat of an international conspiracy makes us feel more secure in today’s uncertain world. It is always preferable and satisfying when the bad guys lose.

Gritty “true crime” stories are exciting, and, although I appreciate detail, and am not terribly squeamish, a line-by-line autopsy of a mutilated corpse is too realistic for my personal jaunts into fantasy.  Many years ago, I went to a movie about a massacre in the old West. My friend and I left feeling as though we badly needed a drink, and were not at all sure that we could have kept one down.

Since then, I believe I can count on one hand the number of depressing films I’ve deliberately seen.  Fiction that is set in the real world only reminds me of the real world itself, and that is what I’m trying to leave behind.

I’ve been a disaster worker, and I was in Kosovo. If I need heightened awareness of the incredible pain and cruelty we humans are subjected to, I can get it every day on the news.

For my respite, I prefer cryptic messages, velvet draperies, moving bookcases, and the reappearance of relatives long thought dead. A knowledge of hieroglyphics and organic chemistry is always a plus, along with obscure customs from dying civilizations. Safe from the rain and creeping fog outside, I can snuggle deeper into my wing chair by the fire, adjust my lap robe, and ring for tea.

Coming up

“Oswego tea” was popular in Colonial times with both the original inhabitants and the immigrants from England and Holland. November is American Indian Heritage Month, Family Stories Month, Historic Bridge Awareness Month, and National Memoir Writing Month. The coming week (Nov. 6 to 12) is National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week, National Young Reader's Week, and International Dyslexia Reading and Literacy Week. Election Day is the 8th, as is Cook Something Bold and Pungent Day. World Freedom Day is the 9th , Veteran's Day is the 11th, and Fancy Rat & Mouse Day is the 12th.

Crafts after lunch on Tuesday, Nov. 15 will be pinecone zinnias. Make a bowl of them for the holidays!  For December, we will be making snowmen after lunch on Dec. 6.

There is a bus trip to Cooperstown on Saturday, Dec. 17 to see a production of “A Christmas Carol” at the Farmers Museum. The bus will leave at 10:30 a.m.  We will stop for lunch at Mel’s 22 restaurant (buy your own), and then on to the performance at 2 p.m.  Cost is $12.50 per person. Call Karen Schimmer at 872-2544 to reserve a seat.

Menu

The lunchtime menu for next week at the Berne Community and Senior Services Center is here, and we have tea as well as coffee. Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch is served promptly at Noon.  We also have games, dominoes, and cards on Mondays and Tuesdays.  Remember, there will be no lunch on Friday, Nov. 25 (day after Thanksgiving).

— Monday, Nov. 7, rosemary chicken, sweet baked yams, California blend vegetables, wheat bread, mango chunks, and milk;

— Tuesday, Nov. 7, pork roast with gravy, roasted red potatoes, carrots, wheat bread, warm sliced apples with cinnamon, and milk; and

— Friday, Nov. 11, lemon garlic fish, mashed butternut squash, pineapple orange juice, hash brown potatoes, rye bread, chocolate mousse, and milk.

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch or arrange transportation. You can also email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number.  If you’d just like to come and help out, give Mary Moller a call at 861-6253, or email her at , and put “volunteer” in the subject line.

Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

Location:

Samhain (usually pronounced sow-en, because Gaelic spelling has very little to do with actual speech) is the origin of the Celtic harvest festival that we call Halloween. To many pagans, Samhain is the night when the veil between the worlds is thin, and communication with spirits and ancestors is possible.

The name “Halloween” is a contraction of “All-Hallows Evening,” the night before All Hallows Day, also called All Saints Day. It is a time when there is said to be a stronger connection between the souls in Heaven and the living.

This is no accident. The early Christians were no slouches when it came to advertising. In the sixth century, Pope Gregory I sent a letter to the Bishop Mellitus (which means “honey,” but maybe his mom just liked the sound of it), suggesting that the locals might be more receptive to Christianity if an association could be made between the two.

By renaming the existing festivals, a bridge could be built "to the end that, whilst some gratifications are outwardly permitted them, they may the more easily consent to the inward consolations of the grace of God.” Festivals were not the only things re-purposed by Mellitus and Gregory; temples became churches, Roman and Egyptian cups became chalices, and animal sacrifices became religious feasts.

Ironically, during the Protestant Reformation, Roman Catholicism was reviled because of this connection to paganism. The desire to return to a “purer” form of Christianity included the rejection of much of the ritual and symbolism in Catholicism.

All this ghostly activity had its perils. It was not terribly safe to be out that night, and offerings of food were set out to appease the spirits. Turnips were carved into protective spirit-faces, and people would disguise themselves to confuse any lurking demons who might be tempted to cause trouble. Sound familiar? (Yeah, I know it’s a bad pun, but we are talking about witches and such.)

One of the best-known “familiars” (servants and companions of witches) is the black cat. The Pilgrims were an especially rigid and superstitious lot. They believed that Satan was lurking in every corner, just waiting to snare the insufficiently vigilant. “Spectral evidence” (things that cannot be seen) was a major factor in the witch trials at Salem.

Having a pet cat, especially a black one, could result in severe punishment. An interesting sidelight is that several of the slang terms and names for cats were also used to describe old or poorly-dressed women. A couple of examples are Grimalkyn (grey cat), and “moggie,” the British term for an ordinary cat, and in the late 19th Century, a slovenly woman. There are other, less polite references as well.

The good or bad luck brought by black cats is a little more confusing; it seems to depend upon your country of origin or lifestyle. In Scotland, a black cat's appearance at your house signifies wealth. In Japan, they are also good luck. In England, they are good signs if they walk toward you, but in Germany, this is only true if the cat crosses from left to right.

If you were a seafaring soul, the best luck was to be had if your "ship's cat" was black, and your wife at home might keep one to increase the effect. If you were a pirate, the cat must be walking away. Cats as good luck tracks all the way back to ancient Egypt, and the cat-goddess Bast. You could gain her favor by keeping her image in your home, and cat mummies have been found in Egyptian tombs.

However, in Germany, if a black cat crosses a person's path from right to left, it is a bad omen.

English monarch Charles I believed that when his beloved black cat died, his luck was gone. He may have been right, because he was charged with high treason the next day. The 18th Century pirates mentioned previously believed that if the cat walked toward you, your luck would all be bad. If a black cat arrives on ship but then walks away, you will sink on your next trip. If you were not a pirate, in the United Kingdom, the reverse is true: cat walking toward  you was good, cat walking away equalled bad. Got that?

If you pet a black cat on Halloween, it will probably purr, which is always a magical thing.

Coming up

October (what’s left of it) is Learn to Bowl Month, National Caramel Month, National Chili Month, and National Sarcastic Awareness Month. The 31st is Girl Scout Founder's Day, National Knock-Knock Jokes Day, and National Magic Day.  November is Adopt A Senior Pet Month, Banana Pudding Lovers Month, and Banana Pudding Lovers Month.

The 1st through 7th is National Fig Week, National Farm Toy Show Days, and World Communication Week. November 1st is Birth of Baha'U'Llah day, Hockey Mask Day, and Dia de Los Muertos (Day of The Dead). The 2nd is National Men Make Dinner Day (Must Cook; no BBQ Allowed).  Public Television Day is the 3rd, and Punkin Chunkin days are the 3rd through 5th.

November 1st is a free concert at 1 p.m. at Proctor’s in Schenectady, featuring the Empire State Youth Orchestra. Call Linda Carman of the Hilltown Seniors at 872-2448 to reserve your free tickets. Transportation will be provided by Helderberg Senior Services. Bus will leave at 11:30 a.m.

The next shopping bus to Walmart and Colonie Center will be on Nov. 2, and then Nov. 16.  Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

The workshop on depression has been changed to Friday, Nov. 4 at the senior center. Walgreens will be sharing information with us about this common condition.

Crafts after lunch on Tuesday, Nov. 15 will be pine cone zinnias. You’d be amazed how pretty they are.

Menu

In case you missed the announcement, the lunch program is now offering transportation to and from lunch.  No driving in the rain, or wondering if you feel up to taking the car out; we can provide door-to-door service! Just let Linda Hodges (872-0940) know you’d like a ride when you call to reserve lunch.

We also have the lunchtime menu for next week at the Berne Community and Senior Services Center.  Halloween will be a party, with decorations and costumes optional. Tuesday, Nov. 1 is our monthly birthday celebration. Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch is served promptly at noon. We also have games, dominoes, and cards on Mondays and Tuesdays.

Monday, Oct. 31, sweet and sour chicken, Asian vegetables, rice, wheat bread, pineapple chunks, and milk;

— Tuesday, Nov. 1, beef Stroganoff, Brussels sprouts, wheat bread, glazed pear with vanilla ice cream, milk and birthday cake;

 Friday, Nov. 4, potato crunch fish, baked sweet potatoes and apples, pineapple juice, rice pilaf, wheat bread, lemon cake, and milk.

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch or arrange transportation. You can also email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number. If you’d like to help out, give Mary Moller a call at 861-6253, or email her at , and put “volunteer” in the subject line.

Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The Town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

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