Yay! It’s finally snowing! Now I ask you, what kind of idiot reacts with glee to a potential disaster? I guess, in part, the remnants of that little kid huddled by the radio listening to the school closings, and hoping.

Yes, I know that the poor guys on the snowplows won’t get any sleep for the next 24 to 36 hours. I know that, if you’re on oxygen, and the power goes out, you’d better have a backup or live near the ambulance barn.

It’s probably not much fun having to pack up and go somewhere else to get warm and fed if necessary, but I just can’t help being excited.There’s something about the raw power of weather, the ragged beauty of the aftermath, that stirs something deep inside.

I also view it as a personal challenge, a contest between me and Mother Nature, to see who comes out on top. She does, of course.

I’m not going up against a tornado, or a tidal wave, but here in the Northeast, where “extreme weather” usually means rain, or ice, or snow, I like seeing if I can continue to live as I wish in spite of her best efforts. I am a preparedness nut of sorts, which also means I’m a pretty typical country-dweller. I have oil lamps, batteries, Coleman lanterns, flashlights, bottled water, and even a few of those military Meals-Ready-to-Eat on hand.

When I moved into my house, I made sure that there was a woodstove with a cooktop. Blankets? Check. Snowmobile suit? Got it. Shovel? Yes, but couldn’t I just stay inside until it all melts?

So here I am, snug in my little lair. There’s a pot of beans and smoked turkey on the stove, plenty of books to read, and that rug I’ve been working on to occupy my time. I’m almost gleeful.

When I was very little, I had a yellow 45-rpm record of “Little Orley and the Happy Bird,” The Happy Bird was a manic character that insisted you sing whenever anything went wrong, right up until the Happy Bird got run over by a nanny goat.

When reminded of his happy song, he was less than gracious. The moral was that it’s easy to be happy when the trouble is someone else’s, but not so easy when it’s your own.

I am a “cautiously optimistic” Happy Bird watching the snow, and wish all of you the same.

Coming up

March is Adopt A Rescued Guinea Pig Month, International Mirth Month, National Craft Month, and National Noodle Month.  The week is American Chocolate Week, World Folktales & Fables Week, and Wellderly Week. On the 19th, the Swallows Return to San Juan Capistrano. The 20th was Bed-in For Peace Day for Beatle John Lennon and wife Yoko, and the International Day of Happiness. Spring arrives on the 20th at 6:29 am EDT.  National Renewable Energy Dayis the 21st, and As Young As You Feel Day is the 22nd. Thursday the 23rd is National Puppy Day and National Chia Day: 23. We end the week with National Chocolate Covered Raisins Day on the 24th, and National Medal of Honor Day on the 25th.

The senior shopping bus will make its next trips to Walmart and Whole Foods on March 22 and April 5,. Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

The Hilltowns Community Resource Center’s next lunch will be Thursday the 23rd. Lunch is at Noon, and there will be a German dinner of sausage and sauerkraut. There is no charge; only your free-will offering. Lunch is followed by an hour of Bingo. The resource center is located at the Reformed Church at 566 Route 143 in downtown Westerlo. Call Mary Beth at 797-5256 for more info. They also have a food pantry on site; donate or take what you need.

Need some legal advice? Appointments with attorneys from the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York can be scheduled at the Knox town hall by calling Pat Lightbody at 872-9400.

Cooperative Extension has free water test kits available. No outside labs or special fussing; you can do the test at home. The main number at Co-op is 765-3500.

The Hilltown Seniors are sponsoring a trip to the Culinary Institute of America and the Vanderbilt Mansion on April 5. Cost is $50 for members, and $70 for non-members. The trip includes a lunch of antipasto, Italian roasted chicken (Petto di Pollo Alla Salvia), glazed carrots, chocolate lava cake (Tortino di Cioccolato), and coffee or tea at the renowned Caterina de' Medici restaurant. Shirley Slingerland is taking reservations at 797-3467.

Menu

Speaking of food, the Helderberg menu for next week is:

— Monday, March 20, lasagna roll-ups, marinara sauce, romaine lettuce, tomato, carrots with Italian dressing, wheat Italian bread, pears, and milk;

— Tuesday, March 21, meatloaf with tomato gravy, seasoned oven roasted potatoes, cauliflower, wheat bread,  pound cake with strawberries and whipped topping, and milk; and

— Friday, March 24, mac and cheese, stewed tomatoes, wheat bread, baked apples, and  milk.

Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch is served promptly at noon. We also have transportation to and from lunch! Just tell Linda Hodges when you call with your reservation.

Does your bobsled-building club, ancient Gaelic history group, or sunflower horticulture club need an easy place to meet? Why not meet at the Senior Center? Come have lunch, and then get together with your friends. There’s plenty of space, and the center is open for all of us. We already have games, dominoes, and cards after lunch on Mondays and Tuesdays, so join us.

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch, or email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number.  If you’d just like to come and help out, call Linda or send an email to , and put “volunteer” in the subject line. Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

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“I believe for every drop of rain that falls, a flower grows...” I love that old song, but do I believe it? I know that I believe in the law of gravity, but that’s not the same kind of belief, or is it? Gravity is based on science, and I believe that science is truth. Of course, there are also quite a few things that science hasn’t been able to untangle yet.

Studies have repeatedly shown that we tend to believe facts and studies that confirm what we already believed before we read the studies. We look for, and find, the evidence we need to prove our position, or justify our prejudices.

People who believe in the medicine they take usually get better, even if the “medicine” was a sugar pill. Voodoo curses can kill, especially if you believe they can.

Prayer is said to be able to bring about changes, but so are magic and spells, for those who believe in them. Any number of social movements have succeeded because people believed they could change the world, and acted accordingly.

Mahatma Gandhi’s desire to free India from British rule became a reality because enough people believed in it, and put their lives on the line for that belief. In a sense, wars are as much a test of beliefs as of fire power. That’s why it’s so hard to fight against true believers, regardless of what philosophy they espouse.

I was told recently that the internal competition within a group I belong to would never be resolved. It has been going on for years, and has become entrenched. The two sides do seem sometimes to be shooting at one another from trenches, just like in World War I. I believe that this condition can be changed. If I can get enough other people to believe it, I believe it will change.

Beliefs can work the opposite way as well. The Holocaust and the Inquisition are ample proof. People sincerely believed that they were making the world better through their actions. I believe they were wrong, but even today, not everybody agrees with me.

The song “I Believe” was commissioned by television star Jane Froman in 1952, to counteract the hopelessness she felt about the Korean War, occurring so soon after World War II. I believe its sentiments are true even if they aren’t.

As a result of this infirmity, “impossible” is not a word in my usual vocabulary. To me, “impossible” just denotes something that hasn’t been done yet. I am backed up by Lewis Carroll’s White Queen, whose reply to Alice’s “I can’t believe that!” was “‘Can’t you?’ the Queen said in a pitying tone. ‘Try again: draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.’

“Alice laughed. ‘There’s no use trying,’ she said: ‘one can’t believe impossible things.’

“‘I daresay you haven’t had much practice,’ said the Queen. ‘When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.’”

Maybe if we all take that half-hour, we can change the world.

Coming up

March is American Red Cross Month, International Expect Success Month , National Ethics Awareness Month, and Optimism Month. The coming week is National Sleep Awareness Week, National Words Matter Week, and Return The Borrowed Books Week.  National Absinthe Day is the 5th; Fun Facts About Names Dayis the 6th. Cereal Day and Peace Corps Day are both on the 7th, and the 8th is Discover What Your Name Means Day.

The 8th is also National Peanut Cluster Day and Registered Dietitian Day; do you think that was intentional? The 9th is Panic Day, and Get Over It Day. International Bagpipe Day and the International Day of Awesomeness on the 10th is followed by Johnny Appleseed Day and Genealogy Day on the 11th.

The senior shopping bus will make its next trips to Walmart and Whole Foods on March 8 and March 22, 2017.  Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

Need some legal advice? Appointments with attorneys from the Legal Aid Society of Northeastern New York can be scheduled at the Knox Town Hall by calling Pat Lightbody at 872-9400.

Cooperative Extension has free water test kits available. No outside labs or special fussing; you can do the test at home. The main number at Co-op is 765-3500.

The Hilltown Seniors are sponsoring a trip to the Culinary Institute of America and the Vanderbilt Mansion on April 5th. Cost is $50 for members, and $70 for non-members. The trip includes a lunch of antipasto, Italian Roasted Chicken (Petto di Pollo Alla Salvia), Glazed Carrots, Chocolate Lava Cake (Tortino di Cioccolato), and coffee or tea at the renowned Caterina de' Medici restaurant. Shirley Slingerland is taking reservations at 797-3467.

The Hilltown Seniors next meeting will be March 11th at the Berne Reformed Church on Helderberg Trail. Lunch will be Corned Beef and Cabbage, at a subsidized cost of $5 per person. Call Shirley at 797-3467 to register.

On March 9th, Helderberg Senior Services lunchers will be taking off for the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. The only charge is admission to the museum, for $13.50 per person. We will stop for lunch, which you can purchase on you own if you choose, or brown bag it from home.

Last week I went to the Hilltowns Community Resource Center’s marvelous Thursday lunch. What a feast! Pastor Chris Allen and her dedicated helpers put on a buffet worthy of many excellent restaurants.

Lunches are served at Noon on the second and fourth Thursdays in March (the 9th and 23rd).  March 9th will be sandwiches, salad, cream of broccoli or split pea soup, and dessert.  On the 23rd, there will be a German dinner of Sausage & Sauerkraut.

There is no charge; only your free-will offering. Lunch is followed by an hour of Bingo.  The Resource Center is located at the Reformed Church at 566 Route 143 in downtown Westerlo. Call Mary Beth at 797-5256 for more info. They also have a food pantry on site; donate or take what you need.

I am told that the first and third Thursdays’ lunch is covered by the South Westerlo Congregational Christian Church at 282 Albany County Route 405, and that pizza if regularly on the menu. Call Pastor Will Balta at 966-5094 to be sure, or email to:

The Crafty Crafters will be making etched flower vases, and flowers to go with them, on Monday, March 13th, at the Knox Town Hall. Class starts at 1 PM; call Pat Lightbody at 872-9400 for reservations.

The Rensselaerville Senior Citizens’ Club is scheduled to meet on March 14th at  noon for lunch at the Medusa firehouse (28 Route 351, Medusa). Bring a dish to share, and eating utensils; coffee and tea are provided. The cost is one dollar.

Menu

The Helderberg menu for next week is:

— Monday: Sweet and sour chicken, Asian vegetables, rice, wheat bread, pineapple chunks, milk;

— Tuesday: Beef Stroganoff with egg noodles, Brussels sprouts, wheat bread, milk, and birthday cake for all the March birthdays!; and

— Friday: Potato crunch fish, baked sweet potatoes and apples, pineapple juice, rice pilaf, wheat bread, lemon cake, milk.

Doors open at 11 a.m., and lunch is served promptly at noon.  We also have transportation to and from lunch! Just tell Linda Hodges when you call with your reservation.

Does your cat fanciers club, doorknob collectors, or Clark Gable fan club need an easy place to meet? Why not meet at the Senior Center? Come have lunch, and then get together with your friends! There’s plenty of space, and the center is open for all of us. We already have games, dominoes, and cards after lunch on Mondays and Tuesdays, so join us!

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch, or email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number.  If you’d just like to come and help out, call Linda or send an email to , and put “volunteer” in the subject line. Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The Town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

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I just found out that I may be one of them! You know, the children of illegal immigrants. My great-grandmother was English, and she was married twice, not once. My grandmother was adopted by her stepfather, so I’m really not related at all to the people I’ve always thought were my ancestors. When I tried to look them up through Ellis Island, I couldn’t find them.

See, I was at the library, and, on a whim, decided to try out their copy of Ancestry.com. The information about my great-grandmother has always been rather sketchy, so here was an opportunity to shed a little more light on her.

Light? It was like an exploding star! I’m  not who I thought I was! What do I do now?

At what point does one become a “legal” resident? At what age or time does one become an “American?” There wasn’t anybody issuing citizenship papers in 1623 when my first folks showed up on these shores.

If you can’t find any paperwork, are you presumed to be legal, or illegal? I’d better start reading law books if I want to be sure.

If your grandparents were “illegal,” are you OK? I know there’s a big flap right now about the children of immigrants, but at what generation does that question go away? Second generation? Third? Fourteenth? Could I be suddenly sent to Yorkshire on a technicality?

Who can I ask? Certainly not the Immigration Services, or whatever they’re called now. That’s like asking the wolverine if your chickens are safe. All the people who originally sailed on those ships are dead, so there’s no help there.

My grandmother’s remaining letters talk only about how proud she was of her stepfather who fought in the Civil War. Her “real” father had a German-sounding name, even though the 1880 census says he was born in England.

They never wrote down anything about religion in those days; do you think I could be Jewish? Or Catholic? Or even Muslim? Am I what my ancestors were, or what I think I am now?  If nobody waved any crosses or palm fronds over me, or poured water on my head, what am I?

I guess I’m lucky that they came from England. If worse comes to worst, at least I speak the language...

Coming up

Speaking of which, February and March are the time of the Cricket World Cup. February is National Laugh-Friendly Month, National Women Inventors Month, and Spunky Old Broads Month.  This week, merging into March, is Telecommuter Appreciation Week and Bird Health Awareness Week.  February 26th is the Daytona 500, For Pete's Sake Day, Levi Strauss Day, National Bacon Day, and World Pistachio Day.  Mardi Gras is the 28th.

March is Red Cross Month, and Brain Injury Awareness Month. National Horse Protection Day is March 1st, as is National Peanut Lovers Day and Pig Day.  Dr. Seuss Day and the National Day of Action (Peace Corps)are March 2nd, and the 3rd is What If Cats and Dogs Had Opposable Thumbs? Day.

The senior shopping bus will make its next trips to Walmart and Whole Foods on March 8 and March 22. Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

Cooperative Extension has free water test kits available. No outside labs or special fussing; you can do the test at home. The main number at Co-op is 765-3500.

The Hilltown Seniors are sponsoring a trip to the Culinary Institute of America and the Vanderbilt Mansion on April 5. Cost is $50 for members, and $70 for non-members. The trip includes a lunch of antipasto, Italian Roasted Chicken (Petto di Pollo Alla Salvia), Glazed Carrots, Chocolate Lava Cake (Tortino di Cioccolato), and coffee or tea at the renowned Caterina de' Medici restaurant. Shirley Slingerland is taking reservations at 797-3467.

The Hilltown Seniors next meeting will be March 11 at the Berne Reformed Church on Helderberg Trail. Lunch will be corned beef and cabbage, at a subsidized cost of $5 per person. Call Shirley at 797-3467 to register.

March 9 the Helderberg Senior Services will be taking off for the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. The only charge is admission to the museum, for $13.50 per person. We will stop for lunch, which you can purchase on you own if you choose, or brown bag it from home.

Hilltowns Community Resource Center continues its Thursday lunches at noon on March 9 and 23. There is no charge; only your free-will offering. Lunch is followed by an hour of bingo. The Resource Center is located at the Reformed Church at 566 Route 143 in downtown Westerlo. Call Mary Beth at 797-5256 for more info. They also have a food pantry on site; donate or take what you need.

Pastor Wendy Cook reminds us that the next pancake breakfast will begin at 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Evangelical Lutheran Church on Helderberg Trail in Berne. No set cost; give what you can offer.

The Crafty Crafters will be making etched flower vases, and flowers to go with them, on Monday, March 13, at the Knox town hall. Class starts at 1 p.m.; call Pat Lightbody at 872-9400 for reservations.

The Rensselaerville Senior Citizens’ Club is scheduled to meet on March 14 at  noon for lunch at the Medusa firehouse (28 Route 351, Medusa). Bring a dish to share, and eating utensils; coffee and tea are provided. The cost is one dollar.

Menu

The menu for next week is:

— Monday, Feb. 27, lemon oregano fish, stewed tomatoes and zucchini, hash browned potatoes rye bread citrus ambrosia, and milk;

— Tuesday, Feb. 28, herbed chicken with gravy, roasted sweet potatoes, broccoli, wheat bread, tapioca pudding, and milk; and

— Friday, Mar. 3, Spanish rice with tomatoes and beans, carrots, corn bread, brownie and milk.

Doors open at 11 a.m., and lunch is served promptly at noon. We also have transportation to and from lunch. Just tell Linda Hodges when you call with your reservation.

Does your curling club, basketball widows, or Dr. Seuss fan club need an easy place to meet? Why not meet at the Senior Center? Come have lunch, and then get together with your friends! There’s plenty of space, and the center is open for all of us. We already have games, dominoes, and cards after lunch on Mondays and Tuesdays, so join us.

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch, or email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number. If you’d just like to come and help out, call Linda, send an email to , and put “volunteer” in the subject line. Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

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Attendance was small at our last meeting, but our joy of being together was huge.

Birthday wishes were sung by the Hilltown Seniors to Barbara Hindenlang, Doris Skinner, Alyce Gibbs, Kathy Walls, and Jean Wright.

Anniversaries celebrated were John and Millie Rossman, married for 59 years; Bill and Linda Carman, married for 51 years; and Mike and Sharon Vincent, celebrating the big 50.

It was reported that Bob and Ruth Snyder had a chimney fire that resulted in extensive repairs. They will be out of their home for at least three months. At the present time, they are bunking in with Bob's sister, Katie.

Trips

Shirley reported on some trips that she has set up. On April 5, we are going to the Culinary Institute and the Vanderbilt Mansion.

Cost is $50 for members and $70 for non-members. The bus will leave the Berne Community Center (note the new name) at 8:45 a.m. and Westerlo Town Hall at 9 a.m. We are being served, Antipasti Misti, Petto DiPollo Alla Salvia, and Torino Di Cioccolato for dessert.

I hope while we are there we can meet up with Brandon Fortuin, a graduate of Berne-Knox-Westerlo who is studying there. At the mansion we will be touring the grounds. Hopefully some blossoms out for picture taking. Reservations by March 15, call Shirley Slingerland at 797-3467

Also, on June 14, we are going to the Mac-Hayden Theater to see “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.” Beforehand, we will be visiting the Whitestone Restaurant. We thoroughly enjoyed that last year. The cost is $50 for members and $70 for non-members. Bus will leave Berne at 10 a.m. and Westerlo at 10:15 a.m. Reservations must be made by May 24 by calling Shirley at (518) 797-3467.

Guest speaker

We had Randy Bashwinger as a guest speaker. Randy is the highway superintendent for the town of Berne. The "boys" of the highway department take notice of activities along their daily work day, especially in the winter time. Randy is forming a "Neighbors helping Neighbors" program.

He had spoken to me about it and was wondering if our group would be interested. At the meeting, we decided we had to make up two lists: one for the volunteers and one for the people who would like assistance. The assistance part would be making a phone call and checking on the person, helping with shoveling, doing chores around the house, taking them shopping or to doctors’ appointments.

There are a variety of things to do to help your neighbor that would only take an hour of your time. This program would involve all the four Hilltowns. This a regional project that has been talked about for years. So now the lists have begun.

If you are interested in volunteering or would like assistance, you can go on Facebook to the Town of Berne Highway Department or to Randy Bashwinger’s Facebook page. Those with needs may call me, Linda Carman at (518) 872-2448. Later on, more contacts will be listed.

Also Willard Osterhout is looking for pictures of any military personnel, active, in active, or  deceased to be put in a book. He would like pictures in uniforms.

Future events

Also coming events are:

— March 9, the Meal Site is sponsoring a trip to Cooperstown. The cost is $13.50 with dinner on your own. They would like you to join them for a meal, as people who participate will have first choice;

— Feb. 25 is the Helderberg Lutheran Church’s breakfast;

— The book club is not meeting until March; and

— The seniors are going to participate in the Altamont Fair. I still need some vintage handkerchiefs. Also some crafts to display in the craft building;

The Altamont Fair is celebrating a special year and any vintage pictures that your family has could you please share them with us. And stories! I know we would spend all day there’ we’d go back to the car and have lunch that mom made and go off again.

Remember there is a fountain of youth. It is your mind,  your talents, the creativity you bring to your life, and the people you love. When you learn to tap this source, you will truly have defeated age.

 

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“Oh, hello. Just a trim, please. Yes, I know that Mr. Mark isn’t in today, but that’s OK. I’m sure you’ll do a lovely job.”

By the way, have you noticed that “stylists” are only referred to as “Miss,” “Ms.,” or “Mister” in salons that cater to old ladies? Everybody else has adopted the new “we’re all good friends here” attitude. Honorifics seem to imply some sort of class system, so we don’t use them anymore. Except in the South, of course, where most of the rules are different.

I nearly choked the first time someone referred to me as “Miss Phyllis.” I felt as if I should be holding my lace fan up to my face like my dear friend Scarlett. But back to the present.

“How would I like it? Oh, I don’t know; I think I’d like to look elegant but casual. Perhaps a cross between James Dean and Leona Helmsley. You know, the lady who was so mean and used to own all those hotels, but always looked gorgeous?

“Do I use any ‘product’ on my hair? You mean soap, or that goo that makes it all stand on end? My grandmother had some amazing stuff; it was called Jo-Cur (no pun intended that I’m aware of). It was thick, and slimy, and tinted either green or lavender. When you combed that through before you put in the spoolies, you came out looking like Little Orphan Annie. It took a while to dry, of course.

“If you couldn’t afford to go to the hairdresser (yes, that’s what we used to call them), you lay down on the floor with your head over the heating grate, and dried it that way. The grates could get really hot, and I always worried a bit about the coal dust, but that was what there was, so we used it.

“No, I don’t usually use ‘product.’ I get in the shower, soap up, rinse, and get out. Usually I comb it.”

She now she gets a sort of hopeless, pitying look on her face, as though she knows that, if I keep on going like this, all of my hair will probably fall out anyways.

What I’d really like is one of those dramatic asymmetrical cuts that Vidal Sassoon made so popular. You know, the ones that were up over the ear on one side, and fell straight down to the chin on the other, except you need to have hair like Sophia Loren to carry it off. I have Twiggy’s hair, and Ethel Merman’s body.

And another question: Why are you asking me how to give a haircut? Don’t you already know? Don’t they teach you all about the best styles for round faces, or skimpy hair, or bald spots? Do some people really want a particular style even if it looks lousy on them? (I suppose so, having been downtown a couple of times and seeing what passes for chic.)

“Thank you so much.” Now my hair is all poofy and curled and gorgeous, and I would go somewhere to show it off except that first I have to take a shower to get rid of all those itchy little snippets.

Coming up

Moving right along, in case you want to sue your barber, you can make an appointment to see a lawyer for free at the Knox town hall. There is no charge, and no income questions. Two appointments are available each month for any Hilltowns senior. The service is for civil law matters only: no divorces, custody, or criminal issues. Call Pat Lightbody at 872-9400 to schedule your visit.

Cooperative Extension has free water test kits available. No outside labs or special fussing; you can do the test at home. The main number at Co-op is 765-3500.

The Hilltown Seniors are sponsoring a trip to the Culinary Institute of America and the Vanderbilt Mansion on April 5. The cost is $50 for members, and $70 for non-members. The trip includes a lunch of antipasto, Italian roasted chicken (Petto di Pollo Alla Salvia), glazed carrots, chocolate lava cake (Tortino di Cioccolato), and coffee or tea at the renowned Caterina de' Medici restaurant. Shirley Slingerland is taking reservations at 797-3467.

The Hilltown Seniors next meeting will be March 11 at the Berne Reformed Church on Helderberg Trail. Lunch will be corned beef and cabbage, at a subsidized cost of $5 per person. Call Shirley at 797-3467 to register.

March 9 the Helderberg Senior Services will be taking off for the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. The only charge is admission to the museum, for $13.50 per person. We will stop for lunch, which you can purchase on you own if you choose, or brown bag it from home.

Hilltowns Community Resource Center has lovely lunches at noon every second and fourth Thursday of the month. There is no charge; only your free-will offering. Lunch is followed by an hour of Bingo. The next lunches will be on Feb. 23 (ham and scalloped potatoes!), and March 9. The Resource Center is located at the Reformed Church at 566 Route 143 in downtown Westerlo. Call Mary Beth at 797-5256 fro more info. They also have a food pantry on site; donate or take what you need.

Pastor Wendy Cook reminds us that the next pancake breakfast will begin at 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 25 at the Evangelical Lutheran Church on Helderberg Trail in Berne. No set cost; give what you can offer.

The senior shopping bus will make its next trips to Walmart and Whole Foods on Feb. 22 and March 8.  Call CDTA at 437-5161 two days in advance to arrange for pickup.

February is American Heart Month, and National Therapeutic Recreation Month . The week of the 19th - 25th is Brotherhood / Sisterhood Week, National FFA Week, and National Invasive Species Awareness Week. Chocolate Mint Day and Introduce A Girl to Engineering Day are the 19th. Iwo Jima Landing Day is the 19th, and Iwo Jima Flag-raising Day is the 23 rd.  Love Your Pet Day is the 20th.  Museum Advocacy Day is the 21st, and World Thinking Day and George Washington's Birthday are the 22nd.  The 23rd is Diesel Engine Day, and World Bartender Day is the 24th. We end the week with International Sword Swallowers Day on the 25th.

Menu

The menu for next week at the Helderberg senior lunch program is:

— Monday, Feb. 20, closed for President’s Day;

— Tuesday, Feb. 21, baked fish with lemon herb sauce, stewed tomatoes, cranberry juice rice, rye bread, and applesauce cake; and

— Friday, Feb. 24, cheeseburger with Swiss cheese on a wheat hamburger bun, seasoned oven roasted potatoes, Brussel sprouts, and oatmeal cookie and pears.

Doors open at 11 a.m. and lunch is served promptly at noon. We also have transportation to and from lunch. Just tell Linda Hodges when you call with your reservation.

Does your Bacon-lovers’ group, Mohawk basket-makers’ club, or Sanskrit Poetry society need an easy place to meet? Why not meet at the Senior Center? Come have lunch, and then get together with your friends! There’s plenty of space, and the center is open for all of us. We already have games, dominoes, and cards after lunch on Mondays and Tuesdays, so join us.

Please call Linda Hodges 24 hours in advance to 872-0940 to reserve lunch, or email her at: , or sign up when you come in. Tell us how many are coming, your name, and your telephone number. If you’d just like to come and help out, call Linda, send an email to , and put “volunteer” in the subject line. Lunches are provided by Helderberg Senior Services, the Albany County Department of Aging, and Senior Services of Albany. The Town of Berne Community and Senior Services Center is located at 1360 Helderberg Trail (Route 443) in Berne.

 

Location:

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