Gov calls on lawyers to work pro bono to help jobless

With unemployment numbers reaching historic levels due to the coronavirus pandemic, Governor Andrew Cuomo has called upon the pro bono network formed by the New York State court system and the New York State Bar Association to help jobless New Yorkers. 

 Former Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman, of counsel at Latham & Watkins and the coordinator of the pro bono network, expressed confidence that attorneys across New York will heed this call to action and meet the challenge the governor has laid out. 

 Lawyers may sign up for the  program, Applying for Unemployment: Client Counseling Under the CARES Act, at the bar association’s website.

 While the network is focusing first on New Yorkers who have lost their jobs, going forward it will also address the many other legal needs that will undoubtedly arise as a result of the pandemic. 

 Lawyers who are interested in joining this cause may sign up on the association’s website. Questions about volunteering will be answered by email at

 In addition, the New York State Bar Association has transformed its website and social media accounts into hubs of legal information regarding the COVID-19 crisis. Learn more at: https://nysba.org/coronavirus.

More Regional News

  • “A lot of these folks out this way do not want to go down into the city to get services so here we’re bringing services to them and I think this is just going to grow and grow,” said Sheriff Craig Apple of the new program to have social workers and trained EMS crews answer some emergency calls in rural Albany County.

  • Once the state hits the 70-percent mark, the governor said, “We can lift the capacity restriction, social distancing, the hygiene protocols, the health screenings, the potential tracing. Masks will only be required as recommended by the CDC.” 

  • “Data show that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected some populations and placed them at higher risk, including those who are medically underserved, racial and ethnic minority groups, and people living in rural communities,” says the CDC, which awarded the state’s health department $34 million to address inequities.

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