Gravino resigns from Voorheesville School Board

Kristine Gravino

VOORHEESVILLE — The Voorheesville School Board is looking to fill a seat soon to be left vacated by Kristine Gravino, who in May was elected — without challenge — to her second four-year term.

Gravino, who has a doctorate in counseling psychology, has a private practice, which has been “a tremendous strain on her time,” according to school board president Timothy Blow.

Gravino did not return calls seeking comment.

Gravino’s last day as a school board member is Sept. 30, but the board is already looking to fill her seat.

Blow said a couple of people have already expressed their interest to the board, but he wants to give all community members a chance to apply for the position.

A message will be sent out through the school’s newsletter, and a post may be made on its website as well, he said.

The board will appoint a new member from the applicants, and then in May that person will have to be elected by the public in order to continue.

“Our hope is to get someone on board before the end of October,” Blow said.

Anyone interested can contact Blow or Dorothea Pfleiderer, the district clerk.

 

 

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