Pulling For History

The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Just like the old days: The restored grader is put to work during a demonstration at the Altamont Fair. It was made by Climax Road Machine in Marathon, N.Y., north of Binghamton, a factory that ran from 1887 to 1890. Andrew Tinning plans to display the horse-drawn grader in June at the Gas-Up in Gallupville, and in August again at the Altamont Fair.

The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Period piece: “Little Winner,” the antique road grader restored to its former glory by Andrew Tinning, looks right at home in front of the also restored village train station, now home to the Altamont Free Library. The grader will be at the station at least through April 9 when, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, Judith Wines will give a presentation called “Tours and Trains in Altamont.”

The Enterprise — Michael Koff
Rallying round the antique grader restored by Andrew Tinning, second from left, holding a whip, are, two grandsons of Casper Wagner, the grader’s original owner — Merlin E. Wagner at far left, and Bernard H. Wagner, at far right. The grader, which Tinning discovered, forgotten and neglected, on property behind his house on Dunnsville Road, was originally used to groom Guilderland’s roads before it was used for ditching at the Wagner farm. At center, is Steve Oliver, Guilderland’s current highway superintendent. Next to him is Judith Wines, the director of the Altamont Free Library, now housed in the village’s historic train station. The grader originally arrived in Altamont by train.

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