Elaine S. Zimmer

Elaine S. Zimmer

Elaine S. Zimmer

SCHENECTADY — Elaine S. Zimmer taught home economics while raising her two children and, with her husband, traveled to five continents and all 50 states.

She died peacefully, with her family by her side, on Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021, at Ingersoll Place. She was 92.

Born in Randolph, in western New York, she is the daughter of the late George and Ruth (née Oldro) Shannon. She grew up on a Cattaraugus County farm with no running water and no electricity. The farm was a sugar bush that produced an annual crop of maple syrup to supplement the family income

“Despite these simple roots, she was an excellent student and was the valedictorian of her graduating class,” her family wrote in a tribute. “Upon graduating from high school, Elaine worked as a dietician in the W.C.A. Hospital in Jamestown, New York, before enrolling in classes at Cornell University.”

While earning her bachelor’s degree in home economics, she met her husband, “Bill,” who also graduated from Cornell. The couple’s marriage lasted for 70 years, ending only with her death.

Mrs. Zimmer was an educator for more than two decades, teaching home economics at the junior-senior high and college levels. She also was an elementary school teacher for many years at Duanesburg Elementary School until she retired to pursue a full-time Shaklee career.

“During Elaine’s long, fruitful life,” her family wrote, “she was actively involved with her church, Guiding Eyes, Daughters of the American Revolution, gardening and Master Gardeners, Civic Orchestra in which she played the cello, City Mission of Schenectady, Wycliff Bible Translators for whom she held fundraising dinners, Mayflower Society, Love Inc., JARS, Pioneer Girls, support of various political candidates, hosting international students, Cooperative Extension, Frosty Acres Campground, Shaklee distributor, organist, and choir director.

“Elaine and her lifelong partner, Bill, loved traveling and frequently went on driving vacations in a pick-up camper, motorhome, or fifth-wheel RV. Their travels covered all 50 states and most of the Canadian provinces. They also enjoyed membership campgrounds and timeshares.

“They also went on a number of cruises and eventually visited five continents and many dozens of countries. Her love of traveling perhaps was spurred by their one-year-long, around-the-country road trip that began shortly after their third wedding anniversary and just weeks after the birth of their youngest child!”

****  

Elaine S. Zimmer is survived by her loving husband of 70 years, William; her son, Douglas Zimmer, and his wife Cherie, of Costa Mesa, California; her daughter, Charlotte Palmeri, and her husband, Frank, of Guilderland; her five grandchildren; and her five great-grandchildren.

Calling hours are on Tuesday, Sept. 28, from 4 to 6 p.m., with a service at 6 p.m. at New Comer Cremations & Funerals in Colonie.

Interment will be private.

Memorial messages may be left at www.altamontenterprise.com/milestones.

Memorial contributions may be made to the City Mission of Schenectady, 425 Hamilton St, Schenectady, NY 12305.

Tags:

More Obituaries

  • BERNE — Charlene M. Lee, who was passionate about her family, died on Friday, Oct. 8, 2021 at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany. She was 85.

    She was born on June 3, 1936 in Schoharie to the late Willard and Mabel Berner Hotaling.

  • GUILDERLAND — Beatrice Doreen (née Williams) Pikcilingis, a religious woman who loved traveling and being with her family, was a long-time resident of Guilderland.

    Mrs. Pikcilingis died peacefully on Monday, Oct. 4, 2021, at Ellis Rehab and Residential Center in Schenectady. She was 94.

  • ALTAMONT — D. Frances Ripley was a master needle crafter whose work was sought by museums. She freely shared her love and knowledge of spinning and knitting each summer at the Altamont Fair’s Wool Nook.

The Altamont Enterprise is focused on hyper-local, high-quality journalism. We produce free election guides, curate readers' opinion pieces, and engage with important local issues. Subscriptions open full access to our work and make it possible.