Dutch Mill Acres proposed for Carman Road

— Concept plan on file with the town of Guilderland 

Developer Matthew Falvey of Rosetti Properties is in the beginning stages of a proposal to build 120 residential units on Carman Road, near the corner of Lone Pine Road.

GUILDERLAND — Rosetti Properties has proposed a development of 120 residential units for a 16-acre property that borders Carman Road, Lone Pine Road, and Danna Joelle Drive. The project address is 3633 Carman Rd. 

Developer Matthew Falvey of Rosetti Properties brought the project to the town’s Development Planning Committee in October for initial comments and questions from town department heads. No formal application has been made yet. 

Falvey proposes, according to the application he sent to the committee, to call the project Dutch Mill Acres. He bought the property from the Mastrianni family, who had years ago owned Dutch Mill Nursery on the site, and told The Enterprise the name was chosen out of respect for that family and the history there. 

The existing zoning is general business, and he proposes requesting a change to multiple-residence. 

Falvey envisions “a residential development,” the application says, “of 120 units which include multiple amenities on site such as walking trail, club house, pool, pickleball courts and interior amenities within buildings.” 

A concept plan filed with the town shows a dozen separate residential buildings, each with parking in front, connected by several roads that would be built within the development.

According to the summary of the committee meeting, each building would have 10 units, and there would also be an internal one-mile walking trail around the site, for residents only. 

Falvey said the units are mostly two-bedroom, with some one-bedroom; he hopes that they will be apartments. Each unit will have its own, attached garage, he said, which will make it “a little more like a traditional townhome style,” he said. 

He expects that many of the renters might be older people downsizing from a home, as well as younger families starting out. 

The engineer is listed as Daniel Hershberg and the surveyor as Francis G. McCloskey, both of Hershberg & Hershberg. 

The project would be built in a single phase, the application says. The building area would be 2.8 acres, and 9 acres would be green space. The total pervious area, including porous pavements, would be 13 acres, while 3 acres would be impervious. 

Town staff commented at the meeting that there may not be support for the zone change to multiple-residence, based on the Carman Road Transportation Study. Town staff recommended that the developer consider instead a Planned Unit Development, or PUD, that would incorporate commercial uses, as the Carman Road study advocated for this parcel. 

Town Planner Kenneth Kovalchik told The Enterprise this week that the town recommended to the developer a PUD, with townhouses adjacent to existing single-family homes, apartments in the middle of the parcel, and commercial spaces adjacent to Carman Road, to align more closely with the recommendations of the Carman Road study.

More Guilderland News

  • “I never intended to be a career politician,” Republican Senator George Amedore told The Enterpri

  • Nearly a year after approving the rezone of 107-109 Helderberg Ave., which triggered a lawsuit over the decision, the Altamont Village Board again voted to rezone the property. 

  • Neil Gifford of the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission said that Pyramid has already suggested adding about 8 acres of land north of the butterfly preserve as part of its mitigation for the proposed apartments on Rapp Road. 

    The company cannot “double dip,” he said, and claim that that proposed additional eight acres of butterfly habitat would also mitigate a higher theater. But what Pyramid could do, he said, is put in more money to support management efforts. 

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