ALTAMONT — An enriching evening spent in the Altamont Community Room on Monday, June 23, presented Everett Rau, a long-time Altamont resident, billed as “An American Farmer, Rich in Spirit.” He was interviewed by Laura Shore, a volunteer worker at the Altamont Museum Archives.

This historian has known Everett for many years, and his historic wisdom on the success and benefits of early farming and his great knowledge about historic barns is documented.

Everett, born in the year 1919, has lived his whole childhood and adult years on his grandfather’s farm, Pleasant View Farm on Lainhart Road.  His grandfather was Peter John Ogsbury, a Civil War veteran.

Everett spoke of the many aspects of early farming.  Using a Farmall tractor was a big step forward for American farms.  Up until that tractor, he said with a chuckle, “We made hay the old-fashioned way.”  The attentive audience seemed to know what the “old way” was.

Everett also described his family’s activities in tough times. “In 1929, our country was just entering the Great Depression,” he said. “Through that time, as farmers, they worked hard raising 300 laying hens, made our own butter and cheese, and grew fruits and vegetables.”

The Raus preserved enough food to feed their families and neighbors and to donate food to others in need. “We never went hungry.  Our root cellar was never bare,” said Everett.

In addition, Everett’s mother took in summer boarders for $22 a week.  That sum included three meals a day and room!

“Neighbors all helped each other then,” said Everett. The names of Altamont families that farmed included Lainhart, Pangburn and Ogsbury. They shared farming equipment, labor, and knowledge.

Oxen were used in early farming days, and Everett said, “I still have the original ox yoke hanging up in the house.”

Everything was grown from heirloom seeds, Everett told the group.  Food was grown naturally, without pesticides. “If we saw a bug or a small green worm on an ear of corn or fruit,” Everett said, “we just picked it off!”

Then he advised how to get rid of leaf insects or worms: “Very simply.”

When World War II broke out, Everett Rau went to work at the General Electric Company in Schenectady on a secret armament project.  When engineers couldn’t fix a particular problem, they turned to Everett.  He took it home and did fix it.

Everett still worked the farm while at G.E. and he sold green vegetables, chickens, and homemade sausages to the G.E. workers. He told the audience, “Most jobs make you a living but farming makes you a life.”

Everett Rau married Peggy Vedder in 1943 and, he said, “We set about making a family.”

Today, Everett and Peg have four children, 17 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild.  Everett consulted his lovely wife, Peg, sitting in the front row,  to get the correct figures: They’ve been married 71 years!

After the war, the Rau family began raising turkeys — 3,000 of them.  In 1951, they opened a store called Turkeyland in Schenectady.   Six ovens would roast stuffed turkeys that sold to long lines of waiting customers.  It was a grand success until 1961 when a new highway bypassed Turkeyland and detoured traffic away from Ev’s store.

In the 1960s and ’70s, the Raus’ farm continued general farming and they also raised sheep. A field hay bailer was purchased and successful harvests followed.  Hay was donated to the state of Georgia when it suffered a really bad drought.

The Raus also raised wheat to donate feed to the Altamont fairground for the animals there, and they raised a special crop of rye straw for roof thatching needed for the Shakespeare Theatre in Lenox, Massachusetts.

At the end of the interview, Everett strongly urged everyone to grow and eat more “fresh” food.  “Start a garden, even a small garden,” he said. “If I have encouraged even one person to start a small garden or have chickens — if allowed — or at least decide to eat more fresh food because it is good for you, then tomorrow will be another precious day for everyone.”

The standing audience clapped and clapped for a very long time.  OK, Everett, I’m watching my first tomatoes and my first two cucumbers grow on the vine!

Historian’s Note: This event was the first in a series for a film being made about Pleasant View Farm. The filming will take place through the summer and early fall, according to Marijo Dougherty, curator at the Altamont Museum Archives.  It is an educational project planned for the  District Educational System.  We will all be looking forward to viewing that.

— Photo from the Guilderland Historical Society

The damming of the Normanskill Creek in 1917 created the Watervliet Reservoir, which supplies part of the Town of Guilderland’s water supply. All manufacturing buildings in French’s Hollow beyond the trestle disappeared at that time. 

— Photo from the Guilderland Historical Society

The house and barns of the old Chesebro Farm near the Normanskill were originally built in 1760 and occupied by Colonel Abraham Wemple. The farm was located near Fuller’s Station on a site that was cleared later to make way for the rising waters of the Watervliet Reservoir. The house was razed in 1915 for that project.

— Photo from the Guilderland Historical Society

An 1890 view of the old cloth factory at French’s Mills on the right. Students living in those houses walked out to the Fullers School, while churchgoers attended Guilderland Center or Parkers Corners Church. All of these buildings disappeared by 1917 when a pumping station was built in anticipation of developing the Watervliet Reservoir. 

Thoughts of the changing times, changing landscapes, changing ways of life coincide in several articles uncovered by this historian.

Joseph Roth wrote in The Radetzky March in 1932: “In those days before the Great War, when it had not yet become a matter of indifference whether a man lived or died. When one of the living had been extinguished another did not at once take his place in order to obliterate him:  there was a gap where he had been, and both close and distant witnesses of his demise fell silent whenever they became aware of this gap.

“Where fire had eaten away a house from others on the street, the burnt out space remained long empty.  Close neighbors and casual passersby alike, when they saw the empty space, remembered the aspect and the walls of the empty space.

“That’s how things were then.  Everything that grew took its time in growing, and everything that was destroyed took a long time to be forgotten.  And everything that had once existed left its trace so that people lived on in memories, just as now they live by the capacity to forget quickly and completely.”

One of the Chesebro brother’s letters that was not published in this historian’s book, From the Historian’s Desk, was written by Allen E. Chesebro.  He wrote of his grandfather’s farm by the Normanskill Creek and was later published by historian Author Gregg in The Altamont Enterprise in the early 1970s.

The sturdy old farmhouse and barns pictured years ago now lies beneath a manmade lake, the Watervliet Reservoir.

Chesebro writes “I can scarcely more than allude to the immense barns and sheds, in which we children used to swing and hunt for eggs, or to the orchards, the vegetables and flower gardens, the fruitful nut and sugar trees, and the large fields of broom corn grown each year by my uncles, to be made each year into brooms during the winter months.

“Besides gathering nuts, apples and eggs, we children sometimes coveted the privilege of helping to sort the broom corn brush in the preparation of the shelling and drying processes.  Though quite young, (I was then about 7 years of age) my impressions are that we worked as well and accomplished as much as the women and girls that worked for pay.

“But ‘every rose has its thorn.’ The peculiar broom corn dust that filled the air caused an itching that was not enjoyed by our tender skins!

“The recollections I have of this old place are many and very pleasant. There were numerous ‘Uncles and Cousins and Aunts’; the genial help both in and out of doors; the individual animals, several of which I recall as if they had been personal friends.

“Among these were Prince and Hunter, a smart team of bay horses that once upon a time ran away and made 7 or 8 miles before giving up the fun. Prince was a greedy one.

“While once upon a visit, the horses were fed oats from the same box.  Prince gorged his gullet with the dry oats which swelled and caused his death, the wise ones averring that he died of bots.

“Then there was ‘old Tom.’   I used to lead him up into the tread power where hour after hour he patiently plodded on, getting nowhere, though doing his part to shell out the broom corn seed.  He was more than 30 years old — and a year or two later, concluding he could render humanity no further service — he quietly gave up the ghost.

“About the place were some fine hills for coasting, and a creek several rods in width ran near the house.  It was fine to feed minnows with our hands; the boat was tied to the roots of a large tree.

“In winter, especially at Christmastime, there were rare sports up on the ice.  The family cutter, well loaded with women and children, would be pushed swiftly along by my fleet-footed uncles and sometimes spent spinning around in a circle that  to me seemed wonderful.

“Grandma Chesebro,  as we called her, was at the time I knew her, practically blind, yet she was always cheerful and most agreeable to those around her. She liked to hear the letters written by members of the family as well as those from outside.

“She was a great lover of flowers, though then unable to see them, and she cultivated many kinds, among them the glorious hollyhocks. I have never ceased to wonder that people do not cultivate more hollyhocks.

“But I must not linger to tell of the greening apples, the turtles and fishes, and a multitude of other objects and incidents that flock to my memory.”

Historian Arthur Gregg’s 1978 column in The Altamont Enterprise tells that the sturdy old farmhouse and barns lay beneath the Watervliet Reservoir since about 1920 on  the Great Western Turnpike.

The Albany County Book of Deeds: Volume 21, page 312  shows that, in 1765,  Stephen VanRensselar, the boy patron, and his guardian uncle, Abraham Ten Broeck, sold the farm containing 267 acres to Abraham Wemple for 500 pounds.  By his will, his wife, Antje, and son, John A Wemple, received the property.

They, in turn, conveyed half of said tract on June 10, 1801 to Adam A. Vrooman for $2,500.  Eventually, the property came into the possession of Elijah Chesebro, postmaster of Guilderland Center.

The house and barns were located on the Normanskill near Fullers. Through a dense wood, their road connected with the Cherry Valley Turnpike, while another paralleled the creek to French’s Hollow.

How special it is that we, as residents of the town of Guilderland, can be aware of and know the history of this important piece of land, an integral part of  today’s living.

Historian’s note: A young Guilderland girl, Susan Carhart Tallman, was the daughter of Edward Chesebro and granddaughter of Elijah Chesebro of this same  farmhouse on the Great Western Turnpike.  Susan wrote of the love and happiness she had when she and her family came back to visit her “Grandma.” Her story was also retold by Historian Arthur Gregg in a 1948 issue of The Altamont Enterprise.

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— Photo courtesy of Michele Perras
Villager Joe Gaglioti cashes out with Gil DeLucia at the register.  In the fully-stocked drugstore, the little girl at the ice cream bar awaiting her treat of Armstrong Dairy ice cream is Michele De Lucia, now Michele Perras, daughter of the owner.

— Photo courtesy of Michele Perras
The full staff of DeLucia’s drugstore in its heyday were, from left, Jack Walters, pharmacy student; Kay Bliss, clerk; Gilbert DeLucia, owner and pharmacist; and Gene Holenstein, pharmacy intern.

— Photo courtesy of Michele Perras
The bucolic scene on unpaved, tree-lined Main Street in Altamont shows the DeLucia drugstore sign, advertising drugs, sodas, and cigars, with the D & H Railroad crossing in the distance. The village park had a fence all around it.

A pharmacy, now called a “drugstore,” is an integral part of life in a small village.  Altamont residents have had a pharmacy, off and on, since 1885.

The pharmacy became a necessity and a social meeting place for villagers.

The beginnings of a pharmacy are very old.  The origins of pharmaceuticals started in ancient Greece when the juice was first extracted from a leaf to heal a wound.  In Egypt, physicians and priests were divided into two classes: those who visited the sick and those who remained in the temple to prepare remedies for patients.

In ancient Europe, the separation of healing between physician and herbalist was recognized.    In America, Benjamin Franklin took the step of keeping the two professions separate when he appointed an apothecary to Pennsylvania.   

This historian can remember in her hometown area when the pharmacy (drugstore) was just that.  A place to pick up your medicine and perhaps another few healing remedies like bandages or cough syrup.

American pharmacies or drugstores today have become small grocery stores, carrying canned food, cosmetics, soda, candy, paper goods, toys, personal toiletries, and many items needed in a household. In addition, large supermarkets today usually include a pharmacy within.

Altamont’s first drugstore was on Main Street and run by Mssers. Davenport and Frederick.  On July 4, 1885, The Knowersville Enterprise, Altamont’s first newspaper, which changed its name when the village did, announced that an ice-cream bar was going to open in that “drug store.”  That must have been real news for town residents!

There was the Stephen A. Venear Altamont Pharmacy on Main Street open from 1926 to 1954.  In addition to prescriptions, they served newspapers, candy, sundries and also ice cream.  Pictures accompanying this column are of Gilbert DeLucia’s drugstore  at the same location.  It opened in 1956 and closed in 1991.

It is the one most likely remembered by today’s village residents.The late Gilbert DeLucia was from Greenwich, N. Y. and opened the pharmacy at 182 Main Street, the familiar location.  The building once housed The Altamont Enterprise and the Altamont Post Office.

The DeLucia drugstore, besides filling prescriptions, carried many necessary items for the housewife and home, it also had a soda bar and sold Armstrong’s Ice Cream.

I wonder if anyone else might open an Altamont drugstore. Wouldn’t that be historic and nice?        

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Continuing with Marvin “Shorty” Vrooman’s newspaper clippings from the Knowersville Enterprise “From Our Files” column dated July 4th, 1885:

Local: Our druggist’s, Messrs. Davenport and Frederick have placed a soda fountain in their store and the boys are now saving their nickels wherewith to provide his delicious drinks for their lady friends.

The show of the season — the first big show will appear in Knowersville on Monday, July 20, and give two exhibitions.  It is a Frank A. Robbins’ circus and menagerie.  They have been highly complimented by the press throughout the country where they have performed and from what we can learn have deserved all the praise that has been bestowed upon them.

Saturday, July 11, 1885 

Guilderland: As usual, the 4th passed off very quietly here.  The small boys delighted in powder crackers and torpedoes throughout the day and about 4:30 pm we had a slight shower which cleared away.

In the evening there was a final display of fireworks in front of Sloan’s Hotel.  Two balloons ascended and it was a very enjoyable evening.

Saturday, July 18, 1885

Local: The residents of the village are much concerned over several burglaries during the past week.  On Friday night, burglars entered the houses of Messrs. Crary, Hart, and Ostrander, and relieved Mr, Crary of upwards of $30 and Mr. Ostrander of about $2.  They secured nothing of Mr. Hart as they awakened the household before they accomplished their purpose.  On Sunday night, an attempt was made at the residence of Mr. Philey, but as people were on the alert nothing came of it.                   

Saturday, July 25, 1885

Local: Thursday evening, August 3rd, the Knowersville Orchestra will give an instrumental  and vocal concert in the Lutheran Church. The admission is placed at 25 cents and everyone purchasing a ticket will be entitled to a dish of ice cream, which will be served immediately after the concert.  As everyone who has heard our orchestra knows that it will be a rare treat.

Monday, July 20th, was a red-letter day in our town, the occasion being the Frank A. Robbins circus and menagerie.  People gathered from near and far and by the time of the parade, the streets were filled with strangers.

The work on the new houses and the improvements on those already built is progressing favorably. Messrs. Tice, Staley and Wilber will be able to occupy theirs soon.  Mr. Osbornlighter is ready for mason work and carpenters are still at work on the homes of Van Auken and Crounse.

Guilderland Station: The summer boarders still continue to arrive en route for the Helderbergs. It is reported that the various boarding houses are being filled rapidly.

West Township: Two gentlemen have been through this place engaging hop pickers.

Saturday, August 1, 1885

Local: Tuesday, August 18, Triumph Lodge will go on an excursion to New Baltimore.  They go by train to Albany, leaving Knowersville at 9:35 a.m., stopping at Guilderland Station and Voorheesville, thence by boat to New Batimore, arriving there at 12:15pm.  A fine grove has been secured and in the afternoon baseball and other games will be the order of the day.  They leave New Baltimore on the return trip at 7:20 thus giving everyone a chance of a moonlight ride on the Hudson and arriving at Knowersville at 10:00 pm.

The fare for the round trip has been placed at 75 cents.  Ice cream and refreshments will be served on the boat, and everything done to make the trip enjoyable for all.

Saturday, August 8, 1885

Local: Nearly all the flagstone for the walk on the east side of Church Street (now Maple) have been delayed.

Sand’s Mill will resume business Aug. 10th having added a new power and remodeled their mill in general, they will be able to turn out work in the best manner.  Feed grinding on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Saturday, August 15, 1885

Thompson’s Lake: Seventy-seven registered ay the Lake View House

Sunday.

Guilderland Center: A.V. Mynderse is building an addition to his vinegar house. Phillip Ogsbury is doing the carpentry work.

Local: We are pleased to note that improvements are taking place in  Prospect Street and Helderberg Avenue. The first mentioned street has a stone walk its entire length.  We hope that Church Street will wake up and do likewise.

Why can’t some arrangement be made with the railroad company so we can have a nice park in our village? A neat fence, shade trees, walks, flowers, etc. would transform an unsightly common into a beautiful park.

Guilderland Center: The game of baseball between the “Get There Elies” of Guilderland and the “Brown Leghorns” of this place was won by the latter, 42 to 8.

Local:  At the annual school meeting on Tuesday, the following were elected for the ensuing year:  Jacob Van Benscoten, trustee; N. Sturges, collector;  F. Keenholts, librarian;  George Lainhart, clerk.   The sum of $710 was voted to be raised to defray expenses for the current year.

Historian's note: If readers would like to read more of "Shorty” Vrooman's columns, "From Our Files," published in The Altamont Enterprise from July 28, 1978 to Dec. 13, 1984, they can be accessed through the Guilderland Public Library website along with the original McKownville Enterprise editions from which they were taken.

Continuing with Marvin “Shorty” Vrooman’s newspaper clippings from the Knowersville Enterprise “From Our Files” column dated July 4th, 1885:

Local: Our druggist’s, Messrs. Davenport and Frederick have placed a soda fountain in their store and the boys are now saving their nickels wherewith to provide his delicious drinks for their lady friends.

The show of the season — the first big show will appear in Knowersville on Monday, July 20, and give two exhibitions.  It is a Frank A. Robbins’ circus and menagerie.  They have been highly complimented by the press throughout the country where they have performed and from what we can learn have deserved all the praise that has been bestowed upon them.

Saturday, July 11, 1885 

Guilderland: As usual, the 4th passed off very quietly here.  The small boys delighted in powder crackers and torpedoes throughout the day and about 4:30 pm we had a slight shower which cleared away.

In the evening there was a final display of fireworks in front of Sloan’s Hotel.  Two balloons ascended and it was a very enjoyable evening.

Saturday, July 18, 1885

Local: The residents of the village are much concerned over several burglaries during the past week.  On Friday night, burglars entered the houses of Messrs. Crary, Hart, and Ostrander, and relieved Mr, Crary of upwards of $30 and Mr. Ostrander of about $2.  They secured nothing of Mr. Hart as they awakened the household before they accomplished their purpose.  On Sunday night, an attempt was made at the residence of Mr. Philey, but as people were on the alert nothing came of it.                   

Saturday, July 25, 1885

Local: Thursday evening, August 3rd, the Knowersville Orchestra will give an instrumental  and vocal concert in the Lutheran Church. The admission is placed at 25 cents and everyone purchasing a ticket will be entitled to a dish of ice cream, which will be served immediately after the concert.  As everyone who has heard our orchestra knows that it will be a rare treat.

Monday, July 20th, was a red-letter day in our town, the occasion being the Frank A. Robbins circus and menagerie.  People gathered from near and far and by the time of the parade, the streets were filled with strangers.

The work on the new houses and the improvements on those already built is progressing favorably. Messrs. Tice, Staley and Wilber will be able to occupy theirs soon.  Mr. Osbornlighter is ready for mason work and carpenters are still at work on the homes of Van Auken and Crounse.

Guilderland Station: The summer boarders still continue to arrive en route for the Helderbergs. It is reported that the various boarding houses are being filled rapidly.

West Township: Two gentlemen have been through this place engaging hop pickers.

Saturday, August 1, 1885

Local: Tuesday, August 18, Triumph Lodge will go on an excursion to New Baltimore.  They go by train to Albany, leaving Knowersville at 9:35 a.m., stopping at Guilderland Station and Voorheesville, thence by boat to New Batimore, arriving there at 12:15pm.  A fine grove has been secured and in the afternoon baseball and other games will be the order of the day.  They leave New Baltimore on the return trip at 7:20 thus giving everyone a chance of a moonlight ride on the Hudson and arriving at Knowersville at 10:00 pm.

The fare for the round trip has been placed at 75 cents.  Ice cream and refreshments will be served on the boat, and everything done to make the trip enjoyable for all.

Saturday, August 8, 1885

Local: Nearly all the flagstone for the walk on the east side of Church Street (now Maple) have been delayed.

Sand’s Mill will resume business Aug. 10th having added a new power and remodeled their mill in general, they will be able to turn out work in the best manner.  Feed grinding on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Saturday, August 15, 1885

Thompson’s Lake: Seventy-seven registered ay the Lake View House

Sunday.

Guilderland Center: A.V. Mynderse is building an addition to his vinegar house. Phillip Ogsbury is doing the carpentry work.

Local: We are pleased to note that improvements are taking place in  Prospect Street and Helderberg Avenue. The first mentioned street has a stone walk its entire length.  We hope that Church Street will wake up and do likewise.

Why can’t some arrangement be made with the railroad company so we can have a nice park in our village? A neat fence, shade trees, walks, flowers, etc. would transform an unsightly common into a beautiful park.

Guilderland Center: The game of baseball between the “Get There Elies” of Guilderland and the “Brown Leghorns” of this place was won by the latter, 42 to 8.

Local:  At the annual school meeting on Tuesday, the following were elected for the ensuing year:  Jacob Van Benscoten, trustee; N. Sturges, collector;  F. Keenholts, librarian;  George Lainhart, clerk.   The sum of $710 was voted to be raised to defray expenses for the current year.

Historian's note: If readers would like to read more of "Shorty” Vrooman's columns, "From Our Files," published in The Altamont Enterprise from July 28, 1978 to Dec. 13, 1984, they can be accessed through the Guilderland Public Library website along with the original McKownville Enterprise editions from which they were taken.

Fanciful type spells out the name of the village’s first newspaper, a forerunner of The Altamont Enterprise. The left column of the broadsheet was used for advertisements.

 

— Guilderland Historical Society

The idyllic small village of Altamont was first named Manor of  Rennselaerwyck,  Helleberg, West Manor, West Guilderland, and then Knowersville. Finally, under the direction of Hiram Griggs, Altamont’s first mayor, the village was renamed Altamont upon its incorporation as a village in the town of Guilderland.

 

— Guilderland Historical Society

In 1890, village of Altamont workers assisted D & H railroad men in building a turntable that led the Altamont “Scoot” through the D & H engine house and back on tracks for a return trip to Albany. (The turntable was on the site of the present Altamont Post Office).

 

— Guilderland Historical Society

Crounse family members stand in front of their ancestral home, built in 1803 on Route 156 near Brandle Road.  The farm was established in 1754 and remained in that family for generations. The house still stands today.

 

The old Knowersville Enterprise masthead of Dec. 10, 1887 that begins this historian’s column came from the archival files of the late Allan Dietz.  Dietz was a skilled local historic researcher.  I am privileged to have been the recipient of a portion of his files from his widow, Betty Dietz.

The Knowersville Enterprise had been published from 1884 to 1891 when the publication

Became The Altamont Enterprise with the incorporation of the village of Altamont.

We’ll continue with excerpts of selections from those early papers collected by the late “Shorty” Vroman, a one-time part-owner of The Enterprise.

Saturday, April 4,1885

Fuller’s Station:  The bluebirds arrived here last week.

Saturday, April 11, 1885

Local: Building is to have a big boom here this season.  D.G. Staley is to have the honor of putting up the first frame in the village with Dietz closely after him.

Saturday, April 18, 1885

Local: Ten new houses are going to be built at this place this season, and probably more to follow.

Saturday, April 25, 1885

Editorial: With this issue, our connection with the Enterprise ceases. We have used our best endeavors to make the Enterprise a welcome and readable sheet to our subscribers. How well we have succeeded we leave them to judge…

The Enterprise  was first an experiment but such has been its success that today it is recognized as a fixture, and we can express the belief that in the hands of our worthy successors, The Enterprise Co., under the management of J.B.Hilton, it will not only hold its own but increase in interest and patronage to the entire satisfaction of the proprietors and patrons.

Thanking all who have encouraged or aided us, and surrendering sanctum to our successors, we cease to be the editor. D.H. Crowe

Saturday, May 9, 1885

Local: One of our correspondents has furnished us with the following statistics in regard to our village: number of houses 82; families 112; population, white  445,  colored 1,  total  446.   The village is growing rapidly and we hope by Fall  to add a dozen more dwellings.

Guilderland Center: From a setting of 14 eggs three weeks ago, James White now counts 14 chickens.  Whose old hen can beat that?

Saturday, May 16, 1885

Local: The carriage business is booming. Van Benscoten and Warner are getting their ware-rooms in shape for the summer trade.  They shipped a carriage to Richmondville Monday.

Charley Witherwax went to Albany one morning last week and returned the same evening which clearly demonstrates that such a feat is possible.

Dunnsville: Although the season is late, many of the farmers are getting pretty well along with their planting and the prospects are they will have a fruitful season.

Saturday, June 6, 1885

Local:  The work on the new houses and the improvement on those already built is progressing favorably.  Mr. N. Sturges has completed his work and Mr. Harry W. Heck has taken possession of his new quarters.  Mr. D.G. Staley and Supervisor  B. Crounse have theirs nearly completed.

Mr. M. Tice’s house is being rapidly covered with a tin roof.  Mr. Austin H. Wilber has his barn and the cellar for his house finished, and Mr. VanAuken has his cellar ready for the carpenters. Mr. John T. Severson and Silas Hilton have their cellars underway and Mr. Osbonlighter is ready for the masons.

Fullers Station: At the recent meeting of the Classis of the Reformed Church, the attention of that body was called to the needs of a church of that denomination at Knowersville, and the indications are that one will be built.

Thompsons Lake: The proprietor of the Grandview House opened his place of business last week.

Saturday, June 20, 1885

 Local: The Twilight Croquet Club has organized for the summer and filled out a ground on the village green.

On Saturday of last week, the New York Riding Club of New York City, finely mounted and wearing white hats, drove into town, followed by their grooms and baggage, and quartered at the Knowersville House. They started from New York about three weeks ago and since have traveled on horseback as far west  as Buffalo and are now returning home.

They left Sunday morning for Coeymans and expect to reach home today (Saturday).  They expressed themselves well pleased with the hospitality of Knowersville. 

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