Police say Pascuzzi was driving drunk, killing two riders

GUILDERLAND — It was just after midnight on July 5 when the car Tyler Pascuzzi was driving crashed on the New York State Thruway, killing his two passengers, and injuring a person in another vehicle.

Pascuzzi, 24, of Coxsackie — who has been arrested by New York State Police for aggravated vehicular homicide, first-degree vehicular manslaughter, and second-degree manslaughter, all felonies, and driving while intoxicated and reckless driving, both misdemeanors — was between exits 24 and 25 when his Volkswagon struck a Honda Civic, according to a release from the state police.

The Honda, driven by Brian Miller, 29, of Schenectady, struck a center guide rail, and Pascuzzi’s Volkswagon began to spin, eventually hitting an Old Dominion Freight Lines tractor trailer.

Upon impact with the tractor trailer, the Volkswagon split into two pieces, and the two passengers, Cody J. Veverka, 23, of South Cairo, and Alicia M. Tamboia, 24, of Wingdale, were ejected from the vehicle. Both were pronounced dead at the scene, the release said.

A fourth car was traveling west behind the accident and struck pieces of the Volkswagon.

Pascuzzi and Miller were transported to Albany Medical Center with non-life threatening injuries; the driver of the tractor trailer and the driver of the fourth vehicle were uninjured.

It was determined that Pascuzzi was intoxicated at the time of the accident, said Jason Jones, press officer for Troop T, but his exact blood-alcohol content is unknown.

Pascuzzi was released from the hospital on July 8 and was taken into custody by the State Police and arraigned in the Guilderland Town Court on $250,000 bail.

The bail was posted at the arraignment and Pascuzzi was released. He is expected to appear in Albany County Court, but the date has not yet been scheduled.

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