Pianowski pleads guilty for driving high on heroin

Kyle Pianowski

GUILDERLAND — Kyle Pianowski, a New Scotland resident, pleaded guilty to driving while impaired by drugs, a felony, in Albany County Supreme Court, on Wednesday.

Pianowski was driving on Western Avenue, in Guilderland, on Feb. 22, when he was stopped by New York State Police officers for committing multiple vehicle and traffic violations, according to a report from the Albany County District Attorney’s office.

After speaking to Pianowski, 27, the officers determined he showed several signs of drug impairment and discovered he had multiple warrants out for his arrest in Schenectady County, the report said.

Pianowski was removed from his car, and a search of the vehicle revealed that he had four envelopes of heroin, 10 hydrocodone pills, and a hypodermic needle in his possession; tests at the station determined Pianowski was under the influence of heroin, said the report.

Pianowski was on felony probation for a previous driving while intoxicated conviction.

In 2005, Pianowski’s only brother, Todd, was shot and killed in his Guilderland apartment, after having cash and marijuana stolen from him.

Pianowski faces two to six years in state prison when he is sentenced on May 21, 2014. This will be served concurrent to a one-to-three-year period of incarceration for violating probation. Thomas A. Breslin also imposed a $2,000 fine, a minimum of one year of license revocation, and the installation of an ignition interlock release device for a period of three years, following his release from prison, according to the report.

Vehicular Crimes Bureau Chief Mary Tanner-Richter is handling the prosecution of the case.

More Guilderland News

GUILDERLAND — Forty years ago, Harold “Bud” Kenyon said, he caught a student — “a peeping tom,” he called him — looking into the girls’ locker room. A popular and successful varsity football coach, Kenyon took the boy to the high school principal’s office.

“The first two times did no good,” Kenyon told The Enterprise. The third time, when he found the boy hiding in the bleachers, he recalled, “I told him, ‘Get down’ and he said, ‘Get lost.’ I got him by the nape of the neck and the seat of the pants and took him to the office.”

That incident came back to haunt Kenyon this week as the Guilderland School Board decided, once and for all, not to name the high school football field for Kenyon as originally planned.

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The symbolic “watchfire,” or very large ceremonial bonfire, is meant to honor all of those lost in United States military conflicts.