Fourth felon sentenced for counterfeit credit cards

—Photo from the Albany County District Attorney’s Office

Elastic plastic: These are the counterfeit credit cards and fake identification cards attributed to Reginal Francois.

GUILDERLAND — Reginal Francois, one of four New York City residents who drove to Albany County to use fraudulent credit cards, was sentenced on Jan. 7 to three to six years in state prison before Judge Stephen Herrick in Albany County Court.

On Nov. 20, Francois, 22, pleaded guilty to five counts of second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument.

The year before, on Sept. 11, 2012, Francois, along with co-defendants Patrick Rooney, 22; Janay Spencer, 22; and Malcolm Butler, 23, drove to Albany to purchase goods using counterfeit credit cards, according to a release from the Albany County District Attorney’s Office.

Francois was driving and, as he left the Thruway, in Guilderland, a State Trooper pulled him over for a traffic violation on the exit ramp leading to Crossgates Mall, the release said; the Trooper discovered Francois was not licensed in New York State, and a search of the car showed he had a number of counterfeit credit cards as well as fake identification cards.

Francois’s three co-defendants were each sentenced in April, also before Herrick, after each pleaded in February to one count of second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument, a felony. Spencer was sentenced to nine months, Rooney to one to three years, and Butler also to one to three years.

“The resolution of this case should serve as a warning to potential counterfeiters looking to exploit the economy of Albany County that you will be held accountable for your actions,” said District Attorney David Soares in the release.

Assistant District Attorney Benjamin Clark of the Financial Crimes Bureau handled the prosecution.

— Melissa Hale-Spencer

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