Melissa Hale-Spencer

GUILDERLAND — Because of avian flu in the other parts of the country, New York’s Department of Agriculture and Markets announced Tuesday the state is banning all live fowl competitions.

Union organizers stayed on script for a rally where individuals brought their own words on what is ailing public education.

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This month, the State Education Department announced an additional $14.5 million in funds through the federal Race to the Top grant in support of the Smart Schools Bond Act.

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Members of the Guilderland Teachers’ Association — over 100 of them — turned out in force at Tuesday’s school board meeting.

Phyllis Rosenblum's home showcases her family history while her gardens blend the practical with the beautiful.

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The candidates have varied views on the $93.7 million budget proposal, on Common Core standards and required tests, on contracts, and on what should be done about excess classroom space in the district.

Catherine Barber, who is seeking a fourth term on the school board, would like to see some of the tasks underway to completion. “So much is going on in education right now,” she said. “There’s a lot of news.”

Timothy Burke, who has regularly attended school board meetings since 2003 and served for five years on the district’s now-defunct Citizens’ Budget Advisory Committee, is making his first run for the board because he believes there is a lack of leadership.

Nicholas Fahrenkopf believes the school district needs to make long-range plans, and that his ability to analyze data to solve problems can help with that.

As a new school board member three years ago, Christine Hayes recalls taking a course where she learned “it takes a board member 2.6 years to become fully functional.” Hayes is at that point now. “I want to give back all that information I’ve been learning,” she said. “I’m learning more every day.”

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