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The Altamont Rescue Squad is planning a half-million-dollar expansion of its building, which it considers to be cramped.

Pete Seeger's voice — reedy and upbeat — carries on in the memory of all he encouraged to raise their own voices. I'm one of them

Frank Cacckello has decided to step away from coaching the Guilderland girls' basketball team after 13 years; some complaints were rumbling. He announced earlier, this season would be his last.

The new AC power project has some residents wondering if their houses will be taken as the plan progresses.

School board member Vasilios Lefkaditis said his calculations showed a more grim outlook for the school's future budget decisions than administrators had presented. The agreement with Berne-Knox-Westerlo Teacher Support Staff was approved with three out of five in favor.

Janna Shillinglaw's New Scotland website may have to close down.

Caregivers for those on both ends of the age spectrum — the elderly suffering from Alzheimer's and the young on the autism spectrum — can sign up with police to be part of a system that will help them get home if they wander.

After several years of entering, Robert Price won first place in the chili contest on Jan. 25 at the annual day of sledding, hot dogs, chili, and neighbors in the Knox Town Park.

A third of the Suburban Council school districts, typically thought of as wealthy, are deemed by the state comptroller to be susceptible to fiscal stress, part of a statewide trend as taxes are capped and property values stagnate.

Faced with reduced resources and a government reform agenda, Superintendent Marie Wiles wants school leaders, rather than outside pressures, to define Guilderland's future.

Westerlo is part of the the corner of Albany County that sits over the Marcellus Shale formation containing natural gas. The town council had rejected for revision its original report on hydrofracking.

Guilderland has 20 teachers on required improvement plans, a measure the superintendent says is unwarranted because the numbers from hastily implemented state tests, she said, don't mean much.

Councilman Alfred Field voted against setting several salaries and wages, explaining that he does not feel Westerlo can afford raises along with surging insurance costs.